Ben Roethlisberger one of many second-tier Steelers that won Super Bowls

Matt Sullivan

ESPN voted Ben Roethlisberger as the seventh best quarterback in the NFL (placing him in the "second-tier" category). It's OK, though, because Roethlisberger will wind up in Canton, someday, and his bust will be made out of the same top-tier material as Peyton Manning's and Tom Brady's.

Ben Roethlisberger was ranked as the seventh best quarterback in some ESPN poll? That's actually higher than I thought.

In most polls, I'm not even sure Roethlisberger is considered a quarterback. After all, he scrambles a lot and doesn't always throw the football away (and everyone knows this adds four points to a quarterback's rating).

As Neal Coolong pointed out, Roethlisberger's ranking places him in the second-tier of NFL quarterbacks, and, I know, you do not like this.

Below, I've placed a comments section for you to express your rage.

Of course, silly me, comments have always been a part of this blog, just like Roethlisberger has always been part of that "second-tier" of quarterbacks, this despite a career QB rating of 92, a healthy TD to INT ratio, a 9-4 postseason record, and, yes, two Super Bowl rings.

Naturally, Roethlisberger is behind Tom Brady and Peyton Manning (don't know who is number one, as I'm sure someone just flipped a coin because they're both just too good to be behind the other). When it comes to that, Roethlisberger is like Khloe Kardashian. If you saw her in person and didn't know she was famous, you might think she was very beautiful. But compared to her sisters, she's "ugly."

That pretty much sums up the career of Ben Roethlisberger.

Roethlisberger will always be considered elite, but he'll never be considered the elite of the elite.

Why? Probably because he's not traditional. He's not robotic. He often tries to fit a square peg into a round hole. And while this usually leads to success (and Super Bowl winning touchdown passes), it's too outside the box for people to grasp.

It's OK.

Hines Ward spent his entire career as a second-tier receiver; Jerome Bettis didn't average 4.0 yards per carry; James Harrison didn't have the attributes to even be drafted; Ike Taylor spent the prime of his career as a "poor man's" shut-down corner.

But somehow, the Steelers managed to win multiple Super Bowls in the previous decade.

Andrew Luck, a top-tier quarterback, should be so lucky.

While you're expressing your rage over all of this, you should know that the Hall of Fame doesn't make second-tier busts.

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