FanPost

2019 NFL Draft Big Board: By-Grade (April 7)

Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Link to the previous March 27 By-Position Board

Organized by Highest Value ("HV#") to the Steelers. Great players for other teams get downgraded here, as do positions where Pittsburgh has limited "want." An HV of 1:25 means the player is a reach for the Steelers at any point before Pick # 25 overall but good value at any point from the end of the 1st on. Getting that player in the early 2nd would be fine, while getting him at 2:14 would almost be a steal. Yes, this system results in a certain amount of grade inflation for positions of need because we are talking about the "highest" grade, not the one where a player is expected to go; grades are never pushed up just because of need, however. Players with the same HV# are more-or-less equivalent so don't sweat the order inside each grouping. Boards organized by HV are sorted within each grade by position: Defense, then Offense, inside to out.

Rounds are subdivided as follows:

  • 1st Round grades: 1:01, 1:05, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, or 1:25.
  • 2nd & 3rd Round grades: Early (#:01), Mid (#:12), or Late (#:24).
  • 4th to 7th Round grades: Early (#:01) or Late (#:16).

HV

DESCRIPTION

1:01

EDGE/BUCK ILB Josh Allen, Kentucky. 6'4⅞", 262 lbs. Remember the debates about LVE in 2018? Get ready for a repeat. As an Edge player Allen has all the assets you could want in a Top 10 guy limited by only-adequate technique and strength - which are exactly the things good NFL coaching and training can fix. As a hyper-athletic Buck he features range, ability to play in space, and of course an exceptional talent blitzing when necessary. This great, gif-supported scouting report from former NFL player Stephen White captures the essence. Do a Google search if you want to find dozens more. Here is a solid November scouting profile.

1:05

EDGE Nick Bosa, Ohio St. 6'3¾", 266 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen, thank heaven. Bosa is a superb prospect as a 4-3 DE, good enough to shape a defense around. The Steelers play enough hybrid formations to do that, and would for this talent, but the complications would drive us fans crazy as we tried to follow along. Steeler Nation is nutty enough already!

1:05

EDGE Brian Burns, Florida St. 6'4¾", 249 lbs. The top sack artist in college football, designed by nature to play 3-4 OLB, and probably an irresistible steal if he falls to 1:20. People suspected that he'd played around 230 lbs. in college, so coming in to the Combine 20 pounds bigger, moving like a DB in the field drills, and posting a 94th percentile SPARQ score was huge. To top it all off, here is no question about his ability in run support and he's young in the way that Pittsburgh prefers (turns 21 in April). It would be hard to design a better Edge prospect from a Steelers POV. Consider: the NFL.com scouting profile had one real issue, namely that "his skinny frame and lack of play strength are absolutely concerns moving forward." Not anymore! He answered every question, and did so resoundingly. Nick Farabaugh's gif-supported BTSC scouting report argued that he'd be a steal at 1:20 and it's looking like he was right. Here are equally glowing scouting profiles from The Draft Network that praise his versatility above all else: bend, strength, length, moves - he triumphs most as a brilliant player in all facets than a pure and unique genius in any one area. Alex Kozora's pre-Combine gif-supported scouting report is less positive, citing "inconsistency" and lack of upper body strength.

1:05

MACK ILB Devin White, LSU {Meeting at Combine}. 6'0", 237 lbs. White entered college as the #1 Running Back in the nation and then switched to linebacker, playing the position for the first time ever in 2016. He literally could not have been more raw in 2016; improved by leaps and bounds in 2017; and then improved another quantum leap in 2018 to the point of being "only" a relative ignoramus. But that astonishing athletic ceiling carried him through, and the pundits project that he has the ability to keep improving until his football IQ reaches NFL levels - hopefully by Year 2 if he works really hard. That required work/delay upstairs is the only real issue people point to. But it is definitely real. He could be slow to read a play even in college and often got faked or fooled into the wrong direction - at his typical 100 m.p.h., all out pace. Football IQ = play speed = the #1 asset required for a Mack ILB. See this gif-supported love note scouting report from our sister site for the Jets for an example of what gets people excited. It's balanced by unbelievable rawness in a D-I player and the inevitable questions about whether that comes from above-the-neck challenges. He is also young (a true Junior) and sometimes gets light in the pants when he isn't headed in a particular direction, which makes football IQ even more important. The Draft Network set of scouting profiles examines both the assets and the question marks, making him sound like an ideal run-and-chase tackler but not particularly good in coverage despite his speed. Here is a gif-supported BTSC scouting report that Nick Farabaugh put out in January. This January Post-Gazette article contains a nice summary too, as does this gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report that is also from January. He came in an inch shorter and a bit lighter than expected at the Combine but the 97th percentile SPARQ score was just as hoped and reports say the interviews were great, and he earned compliments from Willie McGinest and others as an "easy mover" with "great transitions" and C.O.D. ability. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

1:10

DL Quinnen Williams, Alabama. 6'3", 285 lbs. A Top 5 talent for almost any other team, Williams is the perfect model of a 3-down NT who can double as an interior pass rusher. The comparisons to Aaron Donald and a prime Geno Atkins flow hot and heavy, are deserved, and IMHO there is no higher compliment. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile. Just for fun, here's a gif-supported October comparison of Quinnen Williams and Ed Oliver. For the opinion of someone who genuinely knows, consider this gif-supported scouting report by retired NFL D-Lineman Stephen White: "a full can of whup-ass [] with free refills ... Williams is so good and so unique that I don't think I can come up with a current or former NFL player to compare him to." Wow.

1:15

DL Ed Oliver, Houston. 6'1⅞", 287 lbs. A Top 5 talent for almost any other team. The comparisons are all to HOF players like Warren Sapp or future ones like Aaron Donald. Here are the Draft Network's set of scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile ("a twitched up ball of explosive fury"), and just for fun a gif-supported October comparison of Ed Oliver and Quinnen Williams. Retired NFL D-Lineman Stephen White is a huge fan, ending with a comparison to a better and more technically accomplished Robert Nkemdiche. This goes to the Walter Football scouting profile.

1:15

MACK ILB Devin Bush, Michigan {Colbert & Tomlin + at pro day}. 5'11", 234 lbs. Possesses a rare combination of football IQ, speed, burst, pure athleticism and linebacker ferocity. The issue is simple: size (though he is just an inch shorter than Devin White FWIW). No human weighing 230-something will ever win going toe to toe with an NFL Guard or Center, but all ILB's must defeat an OL who has only started to latch on with his block. Can Bush learn to do that or will he be stuck with pure avoidance? Critics point to Michigan's great D-Line that afforded Bush a lot more freedom to roam than he's likely to see in the NFL. Fans point out that getting off blocks is a universal problem for ILB's with this kind of mobility. This New Year scouting profile ends with a Round 1 grade after praising all the physical assets, criticizing his trouble getting off blocks, and noting the suspicious lack of both interceptions and fumble creation. The Draft Network scouting profile agrees, adding that his coverage skills are raw but improving. This January Post-Gazette article contains a nice summary too, as does this Steelers-oriented, gif-supported January scouting report with a fringe-1st grade. The NFL.com scouting profile translates to an easy Round 1 grade fwiw. Bush rose to Nick Farabaugh's #1 ILB prospect in this February BTSC pre-Combine article. A wonderful Combine proved he has every athletic measurable unrelated to size and the highest SPARQ score of any ILB. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

1:15

TE T.J. Hockenson, Iowa. 6'4¾", 251 lbs. What is the HV for a prospect with an 80% chance to grow into the next Heath Miller? That is Hockenson, and the NFL's Daniel Jeremiah makes the same comparison. The similarities are uncanny, from height, weight, speed, hands and athletic profile to blocking skills, playing style, attitude (interview reports could not be better), competitive edge, and more. Others have used Travis Kelce as the comp but we can translate it this way: He just screams ‘Steelers'. The other top TE prospect this year is Hockenson's teammate Noah Fant. Fant is a fully qualified WR2/3 who blocks far, far better than even a Hines Ward or a Juju. Hockenson is more of a straight WR3 but he blocks like a legitimate O-Lineman. His athletic measurables are both solid (88th percentile SPARQ score) and well balanced but it's the tape that drives his best-of-class stock. Fair warning: your humble author is sold on Hockenson's ability to more than replace AB's production if paired with a weaponized WR3 later on. The Draft Network scouting profiles catch the essence of what everyone seems to agree on. These links go to a superb Draft Network article comparing Noah Fant and T.J. Hockenson, and to another article that compares those two to elite TE prospects in other drafts. Hockenson and Fant were also the only Round 1 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard. This long, Packers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report compares Hockenson to Fant and is definitely recommended reading.

1:20

EDGE Montez Sweat, Miss. St. 6'5¾", 260 lbs. with insanely long 35¾" arms (that is not a typo) and huge 10½" hands. Honesty time: Montez Sweat is very hard to grade on a Steelers-oriented Board because he could easily be a Top 10 pick for every 4-3 team in the league, and the athletic testing suggests he may be able to function as a Size XL 3-4 player as well. His Combine performance displayed fabulous movement skills for a man this big, his overall SPARQ score in the top 3% even for NFL Edge Rushers, and the 4.41 dash he ran is in the Shazier stratosphere of statistical weirdness. Wild! Woodley was a good bit bigger if you think about it... At the same time, there is no getting around the fact that in Pittsburgh he'd be a 4-3 talent squeezed into a role that doesn't quite suit him.. at least not as well as playing with his hand in the ground. This gif-supported scouting report from former NFL D-Lineman Stephen White calls Sweat a "nearly perfect prospect" as a 4-3 DE, and only a bit less so as a 3-4 rush OLB. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from January. The NFL.com scouting profile could not be more complimentary of his 4-3 prospects, but sounds similar warning notes about his ability to thrive in space. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, which are equally positive. It's been reported that Sweat has a minor heart condition, but it appears that everyone knew about it before the Combine and the doctors obviously cleared him to perform.

1:20

CB Deandre Baker, Georgia {Visit}. 5'11", 180 lbs. The high-floor, low-ceiling talent of the draft and the #1 darling of the statistics community, Baker projects as a solid B+ double in the alley. His film is superb enough to make both Daniel Jeremiah and Deion Sanders rate him as the potential #1 Corner prospect of the year. The kid gave up one (1) TD against three years of top college competition! The question marks go to his mouthiness (he likes the CB-swagger thing) and some as-yet-unconfirmed rumors about his football related work ethic. The Combine showed a solid but not special athlete that improved for hair-splitters with a better dash on his pro day (a solid-okay 4.46 versus a just-okay 4.52). In terms of Baker-versus-Murphy, Baker measured a bit bigger and much longer (77⅛" wingspan vs. 71⅜") at the Combine while both looked solid but not special in the field drills. Film watchers say that Baker has the edge in man coverage and versatility, but Murphy projects better for zone and has no off-field smoke to address. Both average out to solid, mid-1st talents who'd be a solid double off the wall at 1:20 if they interview well. This gif-supported BTSC scouting report by Nick Farabaugh is a great place to start. Here is an excellent set of Draft Network scouting profiles as well, which examine both the goods and the bads. This goes to the full Walter Football scouting profile. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report has no worries about his speed at all, identifying only his tackling and his age (all of 22!) as potential issues.

1:20

CB Byron Murphy, Washington {Visit}. 5'10¾", 190 lbs. with very short 30⅛" arms. The Combine giveth and the Combine taketh away. The main question mark for Murphy before Indianapolis had to do with rumors that he played in the 170-175 range. He answered those by coming in at a solid, tight 190, but also showed up an inch shorter than expected, with T-rex arms, an average if hole-free athletic profile, and not much by way of an overall SPARQ score (32nd percentile including a 4.55 dash). Why didn't he run the shuttle or the 3-cone drill that should have catered to his C.O.D. strengths? Murphy did look more solid in the movement drills than the run of "awful" shown by other CB's, displayed some exceptionally quick and choppy feet, and has good, confident hands. He's also a very fine tackler for a Corner. The coverage crew compared him to Samari Rolle, whose only sin as a CB was playing for the enemy and being "very good" rather than truly great. Others have used Kyle Fuller as the comp. In sum, he projects as a high floor, moderate ceiling prospect who should be a 10-year CB2, could develop into a CB1, and is hard to imagine as anything less than a CB3 - if but only if he plays in a zone-heavy and off-coverage scheme. Deandre Baker has more versatility and Greedy Williams a lot more athletic and press-man talent, but they have question marks that he does not. Both Nick Farabaugh's gif-supported January BTSC scouting report and this similarly dated Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report consider Murphy an elite, Top-20 Corner the Steelers would be lucky to get. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles along with a scouting profile from DraftWire. This goes to a nice human interest article about Murphy and his family, while this article gives a little insight into his personality. The NFL.com scouting profile worries about his size and long speed (a/k/a "recovery burst when beaten from press").

1:20

CB Greedy Williams, LSU {Meeting at Combine}. 6'1⅞", 185 lbs. He has more than a few detractors, who complain that he is as an overrated talent who benefits from having the world's best name. The complaints go to a lack of physicality, particularly in run support, failure to significantly improve in 2018 over 2017, public mouthiness that may cross the line from ‘swagger' into braggadocio, and a variety of "effort issues" stemming from failures to keep playing through the whistle in various contexts. That said, everyone else views him as the best Corner in a weak class, even those critics call him a mid- or late-1st talent, and no one disputes that he could be truly great if he can screw his head on straight. His Combine was mixed. He ran really well (4.37!) but declined to do the other tests, and looked only okay in the field drills due to keeping his weight a bit high (which Deion Sanders described as a real but fixable problem). The coverage crew suggested that those balance concerns were the cause of on-tape issues covering things like slants and hard-breaking crossing routes. Translation: he has more upside than Byron Murphy and Deandre Baker but also a bigger bust potential, and would benefit from a more man-oriented coverage philosophy. As always, you should start with this gif-supported BTSC scouting report in which Nick Farabaugh acknowledges how Williams excels as a technician, athlete and physical prototype but raises question marks about whether he has the emotional core to compete and succeed in the NFL (and to keep succeeding after he ‘arrives'). Williams has all the talent in the world, but does he project better as a Patrick Peterson, a Justin Gilbert, or (as Nick suggests) a Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie? This article on his family life, and this article on his childhood, may bring some insight about those questions (remember to apply salt). Here are the Draft Network scouting profile and a New Year's scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins. This goes to a very positive Steelers-oriented and gif-supported scouting report from February, and this to a gif-supported December scouting report. This is the DraftWire scouting profile.

1:20

TE Noah Fant, Iowa. 6'4⅛", 249 lbs. "One of the most freakish athletes in all of college football," Noah Fant oozes athletic talent that puts him in the top 2% of all TE's, has well developed seam-busting talents to match, and is already a decent and willing blocker who'd get universal praise for that aspect of his game if not for his teammate (T.J. Hockenson) being all but a legend. He may profile as a league leading Move TE but he isn't that limited. These links go to a superb Draft Network article comparing Noah Fant and T.J. Hockenson, and to another article that compares those two to elite TE prospects in other drafts. Hockenson and Fant were also the only Round 1 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard. This goes to a brief but consistent and gif-supported scouting report. This gif-heavy scouting report from February ends with a Round 3 grade based on some overblown concerns about his blocking. This long, Packers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report compares Hockenson to Fant and is definitely recommended reading. Here are a decent April scouting profile from a 49ers perspective and an early March USA today article on how Fant should be better as a pro than he was in college. This nice early March scouting profile and the full Walter Football scouting profile are but two of the many reviewers who see Jimmy Graham as the obvious pro comp.

Steelers Pick at 1:20

1:25

WR N'Keal Harry, Arizona St. {Meeting at Combine}. 6'2⅜", 228 lbs. BTSC's favorite receiver and also the choice of retired NFL player Stephen White, who wrote this typically great gif-supported scouting report. "Well, watching N'Keal Harry's tape had bad words just spilling out of my mouth. This [size XXL!] kid looks like a Pro Bowl punt returner with the ball in his hands." N'Keal Harry is two inches taller and ten pounds bigger than Juju Smith-Schuster, and can be just as physical, but he's also way faster and more maneuverable. He's almost certainly the only WR that might be considered for the Round 1 pick. This Steeler-oriented, gif-supported scouting report ends with a Round 2 grade based on the author's disputable idea that Harry's skill set might be too similar to Juju's. The Draft Network scouting profiles struggle to find some flaws and tend to settle on the idea that he might have merely-good C.O.D. or explosion. The NFL.com scouting profile sounds the same cautionary notes. The Combine pretty much blew those concerns out of the water with top 12th percentile SPARQ score results and an athletic profile that contains no holes. There is a reason why someone this size can be so good at returning punts! The Combine coverage especially praised his field awareness, game speed and football IQ while noting that the reports about his interviews could not be better. He is listed as one of Jon Ledyard's Top 5 Steeler WR targets in this March article. He is included in this really good analysis of 5 Premier Big WR Prospects by our own Geoffrey Benedict.

2:01

EDGE Jachai Polite, Florida {Meeting at Combine}. 6'2½", 258 lbs. Polite dropped 20 pounds in 2018 in order to play in the 230's, where he excelled as a pure speed rusher with enough bend to seize the edge after he gained that quarter step edge. People worried about the lack of size, however, so he came into the Combine back up at his natural weight in the 250's... and the explosiveness was G.O.N.E. Was he injured? He did pull up complaining of a hammy after an absurdly awful time in the 40. But he also scored poorly in the leaps that measure his main asset on tape (explosiveness). What is going on? Will he will have to play in the 230's? What will that do with his ability to set the edge? And could he maintain an athletic edge that narrow as the NFL grind sets in over the course of a 16-game season? What about a multi-year career? The bottom line: some had touted his prospects as high as the Top 10 but his stock has now dropped considerably, especially with the questions about why his motor seems to run hot and cold. The NFL.com scouting profile, which ends in a strong "instant starter" grade, hints that some of the issues may be related to "scouts' [concerns] about maturity and character." But who knows? At this point it's a puzzle that we may never be able to answer before he hits an NFL field. Here is a good, gif-supported Draft Network scouting report from October along with the Draft Network scouting profiles. This gif-supported January scouting report from our sister site for the Jets examines his tremendous burst, bend and overall athleticism. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report describes a magnificent and bendy speed rusher who suffers from limited play strength and ability to convert speed to power (an issue pointed out by BTSC readers too). Here is a February scouting profile from Draft Wire.

2:01

FS Nasir Adderley, Delaware. 5'11¾", 206. A tremendous small school prospect who projects to be a very good center fielder, but only a center fielder. His calling cards are tremendous range and some of the best ball skills in the draft. Showed good processing speed too even if it was against lesser competition. Daniel Jeremiah compares him to a young Eric Weddle, which is high praise. Stood out at the Senior Bowl in multiple ways, including overall human intellect. This goes to a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report that ends with a Round 2 grade. This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile. Here is the page of Draft Network scouting profiles.

2:01

SS/FS Chauncey Gardner-Johnson, Florida {Meeting at Combine}. 5'10⅞", 210 lbs. He tested okay (top 50% SPARQ score) which actually disappointed fans who see boatloads of speed, C.O.D. skills and range when they watch the tape. It makes for a difficult evaluation in some ways because 2018 saw a vastly improved player who'd suddenly learned how to tackle and to take good angles, neither of which appeared on the 2017 film.He's still inconsistent but now gets a universal Round 2 grade with the exception of those who see him breaking into the late 1st. It helps that he has some notable coverage chops, center field range, and is supposed to be a top notch human being who adores the game of football. Here is an early January scouting profile from Jon Ledyard. This goes to the enthusiastic NFL.com scouting profile.

2:01

SS/FS Deionte Thompson, Alabama. 6'2", 196 lbs. He profiles as an ideal Free Safety with great speed, range, leadership, and an overwhelming desire to come downhill and make the hit. But he is also a 1-year starter whose rawness, overeagerness, and willingness to gamble got ever more exposed as the 2018 season progressed, and that has led to declining stock as the draft process moves forward. He, Sean Davis and Terrell Edmunds would eventually give Pittsburgh unbelievable depth and flexibility in the secondary for years to come but he might take a year or two to get there. Big Nickel could easily turn into the Steelers' favorite package! This gif-supported scouting report from February is as harsh as any you can find, and concludes with a Round 4 grade based on the rawness issues and gambling errors. The NFL.com scouting profile is exactly the opposite and awards one of the highest Safety grades for the entire class. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles.

2:01

CB Amani Oruwariye, Penn St. {Meeting at Senior Bowl} 6'1¾", 204 lbs. Excellent size, length, hands, mirroring skills and ability to jam made him an occasionally-dominant press man Corner against college receivers, but maddening recognition issues and inconsistency are just as obvious. Physicality may be an issue too; he seems to understand the need to tackle but doesn't seem to like it and isn't any good at it. Our own Nick Farabaugh, an Oruwariye fan, did this gif-supported BTSC scouting report in early January. He started on this Board with a late-1st grade but dipped when he was embarrassed in the Senior Bowl practice week (see this review too). With more time to reflect, a 74th percentile SPARQ score, and more importantly an excellent Combine performance under his belt from both the testing and the field perspectives, we're back to that fringe-1st range. There are things to fix but Oruwariye has a lot more scheme versatility than most of this class and can lay a strong claim to being the best of the, "If he can only improve at X, Y and Z" prospects. If he ‘hits' - the big "if" - Oruwariye would be exactly what [we think] Pittsburgh is looking for in a boundary Corner. This careful pre-Combine, gif-supported scouting report concludes that he has "has a rare combination of everything needed... to be a premier NFL Corner," with flaws that can be fixed. This gif-supported scouting report from January ends with a Round 2 grade. These go to the Draft Network scouting profiles and this to the NFL.com scouting profile. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Cody Ford, Oklahoma {Pro day meeting}. 6'3¾", 329 lbs. A prospect with a higher grade on this Board than the many other Round 1 & 2 OL talents of this draft for the sole reason that your humble author has an irrational draft crush. Live with it. Ford's feet are good enough to get drafted as a Right Tackle but his calling card is power and the NFL.com scouting profile agrees that he may be even better as a Guard. It's easy to see him as a perpetual all-pro from Year 3 on. Here is a December scouting rave [ahem] profile from Jon Ledyard along with an equally complimentary follow-up from the entire Draft Network crew.

2:01

WR A.J. Brown, Ole Miss {Meeting at Combine}. 6'½", 226 lbs. Start your research with this gif-supported scouting report from former NFL player Stephen White, who strongly buys into a "young Anquan Boldin" comparison. White basically sees no way this kid ends up as anything less than a WR2. Brad Kelly called him "an efficient route runner", which all agree on despite a sharply limited route tree in the Ole Miss system. Nevertheless, though Brown primarily operated out of the slot in college (an oddity for someone his size) he projects as a solid, all-around receiver who can also be a vertical threat. As outlined in the Draft Network scouting profiles, he is best viewed as a jack of all trades type rather than fitting any particular category. The Combine testing supported that with a solid but not glorious top 25% SPARQ score and no athletic holes. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February. The NFL.com scouting profile ranks him as an "instant starter" with the only concerns being limited results against great athletes and great defenses (not much of a knock). He is listed as one of Jon Ledyard's Top 5 Steeler WR targets in this March article.

2:01

WR D.K. Metcalf, Ole Miss {Meeting at Combine}. 6'3⅜", 228 lbs. The #1 WR on most boards, Metcalf falls a bit on ours because he projects as a superb vertical threat but not the more varied talent that most of us think the Steelers really want. A.J. Brown served that role for Ole Miss, not Metcalf. That said, his potential as a take-the-top-off specialist almost defies belief. Height, weight, speed, hands (minus too many focus drops), body control; he's got so much of everything that people genuinely wonder if he might be too big, strong and fast for his joints to survive an NFL career. The technical skills have more room to grow but no more than you'd expect from a college receiver with a sharply limited route tree. Those are why he didn't start the process as a Top 5 lock. He reminds your humble author of a much less polished but slightly more athletic Mike Adams. Daniel Jeremiah preferred a comparison to Josh Gordon without the problems upstairs. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile. Do a Google search if you want a few hundred others. This goes to a typically wonderful gif-supported scouting report by former NFL player Stephen White. He is included in this really good analysis of 5 Premier Big WR Prospects by our own Geoffrey Benedict.

2:01

WR Deebo Samuel, S. Carolina {Meeting at Combine}. 5'11¼", 214 lbs. An exceptionally well rounded player who will remind you of James Washington; or rather of what Washington's college career would have looked like if he had Mr. Raw Skills at QB instead of a fringe-1st talent like Mason Rudolph. Sales Pitch Exhibit #1 would be the Clemson game, where he embarrassed the eventual national champions with a 10 catch, 210 yard, 3 TD performance. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, which basically admire everything (particularly his route running) with the exception of a somewhat limited catch radius (that may also be due to getting killed on errant throws). Here is a Steeler-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from after the Senior Bowl that ends with an early Round 2 grade. The NFL.com scouting profile uses the words "extremely urgent and competitive", which catch a lot of the essence and lead more than just your humble author toward a Steve Smith Sr. comparison (but 2" taller). This good, gif-supported scouting report from mid-March ends with a fringe-1st grade. He is listed as one of Jon Ledyard's Top 5 Steeler WR targets in this March article. On the cautionary side, he will be pushing 24 as a rookie and the Steelers tend to prefer them younger.

2:12

DL/EDGE Rashan Gary, Michigan. 6'4⅜", 277 lbs. A 1st Rounder all day long who our own Nick Farabaugh has described as follows: ‘a combination of a bigger T.J. Watt and a smaller Stephon Tuitt but just as raw as either one.' The scary thing, in both directions, is what the NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes: Rashan Gary has been so much better than everyone else at every level that he has never really learned the technical side of the game, and will require an NFL coach who can figure out how to get in his head and realize the (no exaggeration) HOF potential. Physically he profiles as an ideal 4-3 DE or a tweener DT which, alas, is not a great fit for the Steelers. For that reason he's been discounted by a full round on this Board. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles. This goes to a gif-supported scouting report by retired NFL DL Stephen White.

2:12

DL Jeffery Simmons, Miss. St. 6'4", 300 lbs. An easy Top 10 talent in most years, Simmons would be a dream target for the Steelers if Heyward or Tuitt gets chewed to death by carnivorous nanobots during the offseason. And it could actually happen! He tore an ACL in February and that rehab time could be just enough to drop his stock down to where a draft steal would make sense for the Steelers. There was an off field incident from his time in High School where he pushed a woman to the ground (apparently for calling his mother certain particularly insulting words) but all reports say he has been a model citizen in college. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

2:12

EDGE Christian Miller, Alabama. 6'3⅜", 247 lbs. with extraordinary 35⅛" arms. The Draft Network scouting profiles and this excellent gif-supported January article from Brad Kelly combine to say Miller has all the athletic tools that Pittsburgh will look for but in measured amounts; i.e., almost-great burst, bend, ability to play in space, sophistication as a pass rusher, ability to set the edge, etc. He's also known as a real team leader whose absence was a genuine issue in the big Bowl game. The only red flags are health related: a bad bicep tear that ended 2017 and an equally severe hamstring that ended 2018. He's also suited only to a 3-4 scheme like the Steelers. 4-3 teams won't have much interest. He did little testing at the Combine other than some exceptional leaps that confirm the burst, and some field drills where he looked a bit clumsy. The NFL.com scouting profile adds some concerns about his ability to anchor against the run and to turn strength into power on rushes. Here is a February scouting profile from our sister site for the Lions. This gif-supported March scouting report has no particular criticism aside from being a one year starter, but nevertheless ends in a fringe-3rd grade. This brief March scouting profile from our sister site for the Chiefs ends in a Round 2 grade as a 4-3 Sam with pass rushing chops.

2:12

EDGE Chase Winovich, Michigan {Meetings at Combine & pro day}. 6'2¾", 256 lbs. One of the Combine's most pleasant surprises came when Chase Winovich, known mostly for playing on the edge of crazy, put up a very respectable top-third SPARQ score, with top-few percentile scores in the dash and C.O.D. drills. Read the NFL.com scouting profile and you'll see why everyone roots for his success. "Relentless, determined... rabid, physical... plays the game like he has zombie blood pumping through his veins... plays his role in the scheme and willing to do dirty work... etc." The question marks went to his pure athleticism, as indicated by the comparison to Markus Golden, who is a 110% football player with terrible raw scores in anything that can be measured. Winovich's Combine performance put that "athletically limited" concern to bed. The Draft Network scouting profiles are very similar to Lance Zierlein's: grit, effort, motor, leadership and football IQ off the charts, but flexibility, bend, and overall fluidity in space not so much. This post-Combine, Arizona-oriented scouting profile praises his "uncanny ability to knock down offensive lineman's hands quickly and cleanly," but does not see the tested athleticism. This goes to an excellent March article from the Detroit Free Press, which mentions a Round 2 grade at ESPN. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

MACK ILB Lyndell "Mack" Wilson, Alabama {Meeting at Combine}. 6'1⅛", 241 lbs. Another Alabama ILB who can fly from sideline-to-sideline, work through traffic, evade blocks, tackle whatever he hits in the run game, cover RB's and TE's, and lead a defense to victory. He causes extra debate because, unlike most LB's, he seems to excel more in the coverage game than he does moving forward. The questions go his native athleticism (good or great?), how much of his success came from his own merits versus the monster Alabama D-Line, why his play degraded at the end of 2018, the lack of TFL's, the failure to markedly improve in 2018 versus 2017, and why he lost his play calling duties to an underclassmen (who is admittedly a rising superstar). All minor, but all real. At the Combine he came in taller and longer than the Devins but, claiming a sore hammy, did the leaps for athletic testing and they were pretty awful. Here is a gif-supported BTSC scouting report from February, and a follow-up February BTSC pre-Combine article that put him as the #2 prospect for the position. This gif-supported, Steelers-oriented January scouting report particularly praises his coverage skills and football IQ, calling him a "straight up playmaker who always finds himself around the football." This January gif-supported scouting report from our sister site for the Jets is very similar: "Smart, fast and a playmaker." This January Post-Gazette article contains a nice summary too. The NFL.com scouting profile calls him, "today's version of an NFL linebacker." Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

SS/FS/CB Darnell Savage Jr., Maryland {Visit}. 5'10¾", 198 lbs. He looks too small to hit as hard as he does but facts are facts: he'd have earned his last name even if he wasn't born with it. Also blessed with exceptional (sub 4.4!) speed, suddenness, ball skills and football IQ. Despite buzz throughout the draftverse he is easier to grade if you view him as a true Safety with exceptional coverage skills rather than a hard hitting Corner - a statement made even though he ran with the CB class at the Combine and put up a 90th percentile SPARQ score to boot with exceptional scores in all the movement drills. Great team leader, locker room guy, etc. The Draft Network scouting profile page concludes that his ideal role would be as a Cover 2 Safety that would fit Pittsburgh's needs; and with that speed Cover 1 should be not issue either. This gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report from February praises his aggressiveness but suggests he will need to dial it back. The NFL.com scouting profile also views him as a cover-capable Safety with Cover 2 chops but Zierlein has said he's reconsidered and will bump Savage up by a significant amount. His unique team fit is discussed in this BTSC article on CB/S hybrids. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

SS/FS Juan Thornhill, Virginia. 6'¾", 202 lbs. A ballhawking safety with excellent range, great hands and a surprising adeptness at playing the box. Drops because he's not the best coverage guy, though his athletic profile (97th percentile SPARQ score!) suggests someone who'd be ideal in the Cover 2 sub package role and adequate as a depth player behind Davis. Dropped an easy interception in the Senior Bowl game and had a tough week overall in which he looked slower than his film suggests. Could it be limitations on his ‘instincts' and processing time, as hinted at in the Draft Network scouting profiles? Or perhaps the footwork issues and/or athleticism questions raised by this Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from early February? The NFL.com scouting profile suggests that it may be due trying out Safety for the first time in 2018. Note that he will turn 24 right at the start of the 2019 season, which makes him a bit older than Pittsburgh prefers. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

CB Julian Love, Notre Dame {Colbert & DB coach at Pro Day}. 5'10¾", 195 lbs. A top notch off-man college corner who never really learned to jam receivers on the line. Fluid hips, great mirroring skills, sterling COD, three years of starting experience, excellent ball skills, and an active attitude in run support. Sounds almost exactly like the scouting report on Cam Sutton but with no injuries, much better size, and maybe a whisker more technique. Daniel Jeremiah compares him to a big Nickel Corner like Desmond King. The athletic profile was average to good, and fairly balanced (61st percentile SPARQ score), but it would be better if his 4.45 dash at the Notre Dame pro day was included in place of the Combine's 4.54. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from early February. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles page and a good NFL.com scouting profile (grade of "instant NFL starter"!). This goes to an admiring, Raiders-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from December. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

CB Trayvon Mullen, Clemson. 6'1½", 199 lbs. Lamar Jackson's first cousin is a rangy, very physical and fast enough CB with great ball skills and stats, but some balance/COD issues have occurred even in college and he has an NFL-fatal habit of grabbing on when they do. The sales pitch is odd but pretty good: Clemson gave him good experience in various coverage styles, and film watchers complain bitterly that he's hard to evaluate because opponents refused to throw in his direction. Innnnteresting... Mullen scored "Average +" in both athletic profile and SPARQ score results at the Combine, showing above-average 4.46 but without any scores for do the C.O.D. drills we most wanted to see. He did seem to be pretty smooth in the drills for such a big CB but benefitted by comparison to how awful some of the others looked. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from January suggests that he should succeed playing press-man coverage with Safety help over the top, particularly in a Seattle-type system, but may be limited to this kind of scheme. The NFL.com scouting profile sees a bigger need to build "instincts" by hard study into pattern recognition and how to read a QB. Here are a 49ers-oriented scouting report from late February and a brief March scouting profile from Cleveland.com.

2:12

CB Rock Ya Sin, Temple {Visit}. 5'11¾", 189 lbs. A ‘Temple Tough,' undersized press-man Corner with the physical ability to play in other schemes. Reviewers love his physical edge but also note a lot of technical flaws like false steps, and there are some LOC concerns. The two may be one if you lump them together as "play recognition issues." Rumor says he interviews fantastically well and has a higher football IQ than you'd expect from a smaller program. Daniel Jeremiah considers his you-know-what-you're-getting floor to be so high that he's graded Ya Sin as high as #2 Corner in the class (in a tight and shifting cluster with Deandre Baker, Byron Murphy and Greedy Williams). The Combine revealed an average athlete in overall SPARQ score but that isn't the real story: Rock Ya Sin got that average by nailing many things but totally bombing the C.O.D. drills (shuttle and 3-cone), which suggests that he lacks any ability to play in the slot. Here is a December scouting profile. Ya Sin was pretty much the only Corner at the Senior Bowl who managed to compete with Deebo Samuel, which proved that he belongs in the conversation with the young men from power schools. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report concludes with an early-4th grade based on a perceived CB2 ceiling. This goes to a good, end-of-March, gif-supported scouting report that specifically addresses the C.O.D. questions and ends with a late-2nd grade for a team that will use "press zone schemes like Seattle, Atlanta, Jacksonville, and even Buffalo."

2:12

TE Irv Smith Jr., Alabama. 6'2⅜", 242 lbs. An exceptional athlete and natural receiver who significantly improved his blocking in 2018 and has the all important willingness to do that job. More than solid all the way around even if he is a bit small for the position. Two years ago an Alabama TE named O.J. Howard went at 1:19; he was 3½" taller, the same weight, and not as good a route runner. Both his father and his uncle played TE in the NFL, albeit with limited distinction. The athletic profile shows good speed and just-decent C.O.D. but a SPARQ score held back by the size and length limitations. This phenomenal summary from The Draft Network scouting profiles catches it all: "Smith may never be a top 2-3 tight end in the NFL, but he's fully capable of being among the best in the next tier." Irv Smith was the only Round 2 TE grade awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard. This February scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants describes the world's best H-back. This February scouting profile acknowledges the talent but wonders about his ability to box out and make hard combat catches. This gif-heavy February scouting report illustrates the upside in a somewhat uncritical manner.

2:12

WR J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford. 6'2", 225 lbs. Juju Smith-Schuster has a next generation clone that stands an inch taller, ten pounds heavier, has tremendous hands (the way he plucks passes out of the air is a sensual delight to watch), and is Stanford smart. Like JJSS the only questions go to his top end speed. These links go to the Draft Network scouting profile and to a Draft Network video scouting report on four plays that show he is a pretty good route runner in addition to a "jump ball, box-out specialist" with two professional basketball players as parents. This February gif-supported scouting report ends with a fringe-2nd grade on the belief that he will end up being "a darn good No. 2 receiver that is nearly unguardable in the red zone." He is included in this really good analysis of 5 Premier Big WR Prospects by our own Geoffrey Benedict.

2:12

WR Hakeem Butler, Iowa St. 6'5⅜", 227 lbs. The best red zone target in the draft. He's almost the size of a receiving TE but has evolved into a complete-for-college outside weapon who was all but dominant against a good Washington State team in the bowl game, and has the potential to be an NFL all star. The issues? Route running, using his size to its full and appropriate extent, and avoiding the dropsies. He improved notably in all three areas over the 2018 season but work remains to be done and the early season drops were maddening. FWIW, NFL analyst Bucky Brooks sees former Steeler Plaxico Burress (Pittsburgh's 2000 pick at 1:08) as his best on-field comparison. Lance Zierlein's NFL.com scouting profile seems to catch the essence pretty well. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profiles, and this to a January scouting profile that ends with a Round 2 grade but seems to have missed the upward curve shown at the end of the season. Call it ‘Round 2 with an upward arc.' Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February. A marvelous Combine (top 10% SPARQ score, 4.49 dash and comparisons to Calvin Johnson) did nothing but improve his stock. He is listed as one of Jon Ledyard's Top 5 Steeler WR targets in this March article. This goes to a nice mid-March scouting profile that touts his versatility. Butler was discussed at length in this March Post-Gazette article on big WR prospects. He is included in this really good analysis of 5 Premier Big WR Prospects by our own Geoffrey Benedict. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

2:12

WR Parris Campbell, Ohio St. 5'11⅞", 205 lbs. The scouting reports conflict on who and what Parris Campbell is. Kyle Crabbs' Draft Network scouting profile describes him as a premier deep threat with astonishing athletic talents (legit 4.3 speed and superb quickness) held back by weak route running and questionable hands. This Steeler-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from Alex Kozora describes a 4.45 slot receiver with good hands and savvy route running skills held down by question marks because he rarely had to defeat press coverage. The testable win goes to... Crabbs! Parris Campbell absolutely destroyed the Combine, compiling a 99.8th percentile SPARQ score headlined by a 4.31 dash and supported with equally good explosion and agility numbers. Our summary? He is a capital letter Weapon who will tilt fields with end arounds and other gadget plays but may take a little time to build his craft as a pure WR. If he can get the craft right and develop his hands, there are no limits. Here is a January scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins. Here is a nice background article on his family life growing up. This February Saints-oriented scouting profile considers him a Round 2 player if he really does run a 4.30 dash at the Combine. This typically excellent 11-minute video scouting report from Matt Waldman says he has some genuine, fundamentals-based steak to back up the athletic sizzle.

2:12

WR Emanuel Hall, Missouri. 6'1⅞", 201 lbs. The speed and COD skills you expect from a 5'9" jitterbug in a body that is half a foot taller = top ⅓ of 1% SPARQ score. A successful deep threat against SEC defenses, with the tools to be a great route runner... that is a high ceiling if ever there was one. The downsides are very raw route running skills on a limited route tree, and a 2017 reputation for inconsistent hands that was much assuaged by better play in 2018. Here is the Draft Network scouting profile, and a Steeler-oriented, gif-supported scouting report. The NFL.com scouting profile compares him to a 6'2" Mike Wallace, which could actually be fair.

2:12

WR Kelvin Harmon, N.C. State. 6'2½", 221 lbs. Big, tough, strong, blocks like a TE but runs like a WR and rarely gets caught from behind despite what the 40-time and the distinctly average SPARQ score may show. Projects as a bigger & nastier version of Juju or Anquan Boldin; or as this gif-supported scouting report puts it, "a true alpha go-to guy who can take over games." Here is a gif-supported scouting report that extols his superior route running skills. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profiles. The NFL.com scouting report compares him to known Steeler-killer Mohamed Sanu ("he knows how to play and he plays to his strengths"). The only issue is whether two Juju-types on one receiving outfit is one too many. He is listed as one of Jon Ledyard's Top 5 Steeler WR targets in this March article. This pre-Combine, gif-supported scouting report agrees with the others up and down the line, ending with a Round 1 grade. He is included in this really good analysis of 5 Premier Big WR Prospects by our own Geoffrey Benedict.

Steelers Pick at 2:20

2:24

DL Jerry Tillery, Notre Dame. 6'6½", 295 lbs. with the best SPARQ score in the class. Built like a Steeler D-Lineman and plays like one too. He singlehandedly destroyed a good Stanford team. Round 1 talent for any team that can teach him to keep his pad level down and to use those long arms effectively. He does, however, come with a warning tag the Walter Football scouting profile describes as follows: "His pre-draft meetings and visits are going to be crucial [] because even scouts who like him as a player say that Tillery's personality is a problem." What could that mean? Well, the Combine coverage explored that at length. Here's the issue: Tillery is an exceptionally smart and well rounded young man, a deep thinker who subscribes to ‘radical' publications like The Economist and The New Yorker, and thus the scouts in question are worrying about whether he's too uppity to dedicate himself to the NFL grind. Aaaargh! I only keep that in here to hold the idea up for the public scorn it deserves. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile ("should become an instant starter").

2:24

DL Christian Wilkins, Clemson. 6'3¼", 315 lbs. This gif-supported scouting report from retired NFL D-Lineman Stephen White is as entertaining and helpful as ever. White describes Wilkins as sturdy, quick, and exceptionally good at beating double teams, though other reviewers have said he could use some sand in his pants if he wants to simply fight them. Great movement, bend and agility for a man that size suits him for the 1- and 3-tech roles. He is so renowned for high character, brains and leadership that his head coach once said, without joking, that "He's either going to be the president, or he's going to know him." Round 1 prospect discounted for lack of need. Here is the Draft Wire scouting profile and the set of Draft Network scouting profiles. This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile, which lauds his "face of the franchise personality" while noting ways he could instantly improve with better conditioning.

2:24

SS Johnathan Abram, Miss. St. 5'11⅜", 205 lbs. Possess all the assets you look for in a between-the-hashes Strong Safety enforcer: size, speed, ferocity, and both the ability and willingness to bring the lumber when he arrives. "All gas and no brakes!" Yes, his eagerness can cause him to miss the tackle completely, and yes, he has sometimes been a hair slow to read and react to the situation, but those are coachable flaws. Interviews will matter a lot, especially since the Steelers would see him as a somewhat lesser version of Terrell Edmunds. Maybe more Keanu Neal? Here is the Draft Network scouting profiles page. This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile.

2:24

SS/FS Amani Hooker, Iowa. 5'11⅜", 210 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profile describes a do-it-all instinctive safety with every asset but pure athletic talent ("super-limited athlete" was one painful description). Enter the Combine and a SPARQ score worthy of the NFL's 80th percentile and everyone goes scurrying back to see what's what. This pre-Combine, Steelers-oriented and gif-supported scouting report agrees, but ends in a Round 2 grade based on the whole player. So Cover 1 center fielder may be out, but Cover 2 should work easily because he has also a great football IQ. Indeed, Hooker was such a living highlight reel in college that he might want to start worrying less about the "flash" and more about the "right". He has a dynamic impact on the game, but his excess aggression can gets him into trouble. Lance Zierlein's NFL.com scouting profile has him as the #4 ranked Safety overall.

2:24

SS Taylor Rapp, Washington {Meeting at Combine}. 5'11¾", 208 lbs. He's shown all the assets you want except the range to play center field. His coverage skills are good enough for TE's, RB's and quite a few WR's; he takes good angles toward tackles in space and in run support; he packs a truly nasty attitude when he arrives on the scene; and balls somehow like to find him. Taylor Rapp is everything that Marcus Allen and Jordan Dangerfield are, except better. But weren't we hoping to get someone who could add depth behind Sean Davis? He did not run a 40 but put up some very noteworthy times in the C.O.D. drills. These links go to the Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February. This goes to a nice, if fluffy, human interest backstory article.

2:24

CB David Long, Michigan. 5'10⅝", 196 lbs. How did a SPARQ score wonder from a major school with a balanced athletic profile (best of show in the shuttle) and good production manage to slip past earlier versions of this Board? I have no idea, and apologize. But I can offer this brilliant line from the NFL.com scouting profile for your entertainment: "Death, taxes and David Long sitting under a receiver's chin waiting to jam and bully the release - all three are inevitable." The word for him is ‘consistent' and that may be exactly what Pittsburgh is looking for. The Draft Network scouting profiles page describes him as an athletic but undersized press Corner, which seems fair based on the tape but may understate the versatility suggested by his Combine testing.

2:24

TE Dawson Knox, Ole Miss. 6'4⅜", 254 lbs. Jon Ledyard's Draft Network scouting profile and the Combine results both confirm that Knox is one of the most athletic TEs in the draft, but it is still just pie in the sky because Knox was underutilized in college. He flashes every asset you could ask for - size, strength, speed, hands, blocking, etc. - but he hasn't actually shown that he can stand out as more than a puzzle piece. Knox, Sternberger Nauta and Raymond were the four interchangeable Round 3 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard, with only Fant, Hockenson and Irv Smith, Jr. ahead of them.

2:24

WR Mecole Hardman, Georgia. 5'10¼", 187 lbs. Liquid speed (he was bitterly unhappy when he ran a 4.34 at the Combine), crazy COD skills and sheer explosiveness make him a danger to score from anywhere on the field, including real productivity as a kick returner. The Combine coverage crew described him as an "ankle breaker" who, when he gets in the open field, "is like watching a bunch of rowboats trying to catch a speedboat." The athleticism is real: he even came in with a top 25% SPARQ score without doing the agility drills. All that said, he is so raw that most pundits really hoped he would return to school in order to sharpen his skills before going up against grown men who know their trade already. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile. Steeler Nation should probably view him more as a multifaceted offensive weapon than a true WR, but with the upside to add those skills to his resume.

2:24

WR Antoine Wesley, Texas Tech. 6'4⅛", 206 lbs. A 6'5" receiver that can run any route, do it well, and snag any ball that is almost in reach? The Steelers are gonna love this one. He is all wire and bone but surprisingly shifty and willing to block in addition to using his height. Here is a good December scouting report from Brad Kelly and a gif-supported scouting report from Trevor Sikkema. This goes to a video scouting report focused on his route running skills. The NFL.com scouting profile makes a particularly interesting read with lines like these: "Historically, players with comparable height, weight and lack of speed numbers get drafted later and struggle to make a difference in the league; however, his ridiculous ball skills and functional separation in tight quarters give him a chance to buck the trend... ‘Elite ball skills' is not hyperbole." Part 2 of Geoffrey Benedict's Big WR series examines his film in more detail.

3:01

DL/EDGE Charles Omenihu, Texas {Visit}. 6'4½", 274 lbs. with 36" (not a typo!) arms. A super explosive, amazingly long, but undersized penetrator who could conceivably go in Round 1 to a 4-3 team looking for a DE who can shift inside for sub package work. Not a good value or system fit for Pittsburgh unless there are some really surprising movement skills (78% shuttle and 41% 3-cone, with explosion out the roof). Could he really be a Rush OLB of the same sort as Woodley? Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the slightly less complimentary NFL.com scouting profile. Joe Boyd's statistical analysis Fanpost confirms how well he fits the Steelers' preferred draft profile.

3:01

EDGE Clelin Ferrell ("Furl"), Clemson. 6'4⅜", 264 lbs. A potential Top 15 player but only as a 4-3 DE. Period. You can admire his array of pass rushing moves, exceptional length, and power all you want; and his productivity; and his leadership; and his ineffable knack of finding a path to victory when he needs it most; but Clelin Ferrell simply would not function half as well in a system like Pittsburgh's that would require him to move in space. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, along with a scouting profile from DraftWire and a gif-supported scouting report from Trevor Sikkema. This goes to an admiring NFL.com scouting profile.

3:01

EDGE D'Andre Walker, Georgia. 6'2⅜", 251 lbs. with long 34⅜" arms. An athletic specimen who could test out of the building and needs to if he wants to hear his name on Day 2. And thus, in strict accordance with Murphy's law, he did none of the Combine tests. Arrgh. The Steelers and other 3-4 teams may like him more than the 4-3 ones. The Draft Network scouting profiles describe a player who has all the individual assets you want but has never managed to unite them into an organized pass rush. The NFL.com scouting profile suggests that he "could find early work as a rotational edge-bending rush specialist" while he works on various technical shortcomings. He's reported to be good but inconsistent at setting the edge in the run game and capable of dropping into space. This goes to a DraftWire interview. This solid looking March scouting report compares him to a bendier Kyle Van Noy.

3:01

CB Justin Layne, Michigan St. {Visit}. 6'1¾", 192 lbs. A long Corner prospect with tremendous athletic talent, a good attitude toward tackling, and room to grow with his technique, football IQ, and overall physique. The Combine athletic testing put him in the 90th SPARQ score percentile and a very well rounded athletic profile that showed no particular holes. The coverage crew lauded his patience in coverage ("he never takes the cheese") but suggested he was another "Carroll type" who might (not would, just might) have some system limitations. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. The Draft Network scouting profiles page projects him as you'd predict from the physical description: a potentially good press Corner who will struggle with other schemes. Also listed in this pre-Combine article on "prospects who deserve more buzz". Here is a decent, gif-supported scouting report from late February. This pre-Combine, gif-supported and Steeler-oriented scouting report ends with a fringe-3rd grade based on some perceived athletic limitations like a stiffness in his game and worries about his recovery speed. Did the Combine answer those questions?

3:01

OL/CENTER/GUARD Garrett Bradbury, NC State. 6'2⅞", 306 lbs. A great athlete overall with everything you want in a Center but true country strength; a nimble-footed, throwback player fans will appreciate. Could be Maurkice Pouncey's successor if he manages to ‘get it.' The Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and almost all other pundits paint him as a solid mid- to late-1st talent for the right team.

3:01

OL/TACKLE Andre Dillard, Wash. St. 6'5", 315 lbs. Maybe a tiny bit undersized but the best overall SPARQ athlete of the class, good technique, and especially noteworthy feet. Projects as a fantastic pass blocker who needs to work on digging opponents out in the run game. Round 1 talent for the right team.

3:01

OL/CENTER Elgton Jenkins, Miss. St. 6'4½", 310 lbs. An efficient and solid technician without any flash who gets the job done on a week in, week out basis against the SEC's best. Film watchers will love him. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

3:01

OL/GUARD/CENTER Chris Lindstrom, Boston Coll. 6'3¾", 308 lbs. A complete Guard with the ability to play Center too. Lindstrom is a wonderful athlete who's all but plug and play ready to start in the pro game and will be picked in Round 1 or 2 if there is any justice in the world. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

3:01

OL/TACKLE Greg Little, Ole Miss. 6'5¼", 310 lbs. with apelike 35¼" arms and corresponding 10¼" hands. Designed by nature to be an offensive tackle but a perpetual underachiever with technical flaws. All he needs is a really great coach. A developmental fringe-1st talent for the right team who could conceivably fall in this deep class. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and a Draft Wire scouting profile.

3:01

OL/CENTER Erik McCoy, Texas A&M. 6'3⅞", 303 lbs. A Center who would be the easy #1 in many classes but has serious competition this year from Bradbury. Think Pouncey but without over-the-top athleticism. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

3:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE/CENTER Dalton Risner, Kansas St. 6'4¾", 312 lbs. The most versatile lineman in the draft and an easy Round 1 talent in most years, who might drop to Round 2 in this one. The NFL.com scouting profile grades him as an instant starter who is more mobile, technically sound, and tough than huge and mauling. The Draft Network scouting profiles would agree. He fits the Steeler profile to a tee but won't be around when the Steelers start considering OL prospects. This article calls him a Top 40 talent after a tremendous Senior Bowl. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from February.

3:01

OL/TACKLE Jawaan Taylor, Florida. 6'5", 312 lbs. So much talent, athleticism, and basically sound tape that he is almost sure to go in Round 1 even though he will need coaching to achieve true NFL technique. He could even go to the Broncos at 1:10 as a "welcome aboard" gift from Elway to Coach Munchak. Here are some equally enthusiastic reviews in the NFL.com scouting profile, the Draft Network scouting profiles and a deeper gif-supported scouting report from Kyle Crabbs. This gif-supported scouting report by retired NFL D-Lineman Stephen White calls Taylor a "run, don't walk" Right Tackle prospect who only got beat by the likes of Josh Allen and Montez Sweat, and gave them a fair share of the business in return.

3:01

OL/TACKLE Jonah Williams, Alabama. 6'4½", 302 lbs. Per former NFL D-Lineman Stephen White: Jonah Williams can be a franchise Left Tackle in the NFL, short arms be damned. ‘Nuff said from a man who ought to know. And if he fails at Tackle he'd be just as good or better inside. It Ain't Gonna Happen Steeler Nation and this is a stupid grade for a Round 1 lock.

3:01

TE Jace Sternberger, Texas A&M. 6'4", 250 lbs. Get this story: scout goes to a JUCO to see another player; the TE catches his eye instead; the TE gets recruited to play his redshirt Junior (actual Senior) year at Texas A&M; the TE wins the spring ball MVP, which Jimbo Fisher has never awarded to any TE ever; the TE becomes a star seam-busting weapon in 2018; and now he enters the NFL draft. Not a word of fiction in the lot. The "physical tools are tantalizing, both as a blocker and receiver," but he is quite raw in all areas and may need a redshirt year to build professional strength and technique. That said, he does boast a proper TE tough-guy attitude as well and actually likes to block despite his occasional lack of results. He projects best as a pass catching TE who will survive but not thrive in-line. Sternberger, Knox, Nauta and Raymond were the four interchangeable Round 3 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard, with only Fant, Hockenson and Irv Smith, Jr. ahead of them. Also listed in this pre-Combine article on "prospects who deserve more buzz". Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

3:01

WR Andy Isabella, U. Mass. {Visit}. 5'8¾", 188 lbs. and correspondingly small arms, hands, etc. He might not have the size but he certainly has the 4.31 speed to win vertically. Does he have the shiftiness and quickness to be a slot receiver in the Welker/Edelman/Rogers/Switzer role? That's a tough one. In a lot of ways he is more like an elf-sized D.K. Metcalf (pure vertical threat) than a jitterbug slot player. Especially with suspect hands that would have trouble holding on when he gets smacked on a crossing route. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profile, and this to a gif-supported article on his domination of the Senior Bowl practices. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from early February.

Steelers Pick at 3:02

3:12

DL Dre'Mont Jones, Ohio State. 6'2¾", 281 lbs. A 1 and 3-tech prospect with tape sort of like slightly smaller version of Javon Hargrave with experience at Ohio State instead of Nowhere U. Projects as a terrific interior pass rusher but needs more sand in the pants to handle run defense. OTOH, Hargrave's athletic testing put Jones' to shame. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report, and the NFL.com scouting profile.

3:12

EDGE Ben Banogu, TCU {Visit}. 6'3½", 247 lbs. Banogu ("BAN-oh-goo") has the athletic assets you want but has shown little in the way of a pass rush plan or the technique to use those assets. He put up an amazing top 3% SPARQ score at the Combine with results heavily skewed toward C.O.D. skills and explosion, while also moving remarkably well in all the field drills. Impressive enough to really stand out! The Draft Network scouting profiles all worry about the lack of bend and flexibility, which makes you wonder why the tape and the testing show such a big difference. They do, however, describe him as the sort of gritty, blue-collar player who will find a way to scrape, claw, bite and outwork the world if that's what it will take to make a roster. The NFL.com scouting profile does not knock his bend but does observe that he can't seem to turn his good upfield burst into a threat against the edge. This gif-supported September scouting report from our sister site for the Cowboys (remember that TCU is a local school to them) mentions that Banogu was getting some Round 2 hype at the time. This goes to a useful Mid-March DraftWire interview. This Bears-oriented February scouting profile pegs him as a likely Round 4 pick who'd be great boom or bust value later on for a team with limited need and picks. This post-Combine scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants has him in the Round 3-5 value range. This March scouting profile makes what could be an apt comparison to former TCU and current Bills Edge player Jerry Hughes.

3:12

MACK ILB Ben Burr-Kirven, Washington {Visit}. 6'0", 230 lbs. A physical and explosive monster with monstrous college production, a football player's heart, the agility to cover some slot receivers, and a floor at "special teams demon." He has almost everything you'd want except NFL size, and it showed with subtleties like his tackling radius. His athletic spider graph is amazing because he nails every performance test but flunks every physical measurement (averages out to a top-20% SPARQ score). If you're into such things check out this analytics-heavy website that concludes with a player comp to Thomas Davis. You can see Jon Ledyard and Ben Solak dive into his game here. He was also discussed in Nick Farabaugh's February BTSC pre-Combine article on favorite ILB prospects. The NFL.com scouting profile suggests that his college production required a DL that kept him clean. The Comments section to this March scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants illustrate the truth that BBK was thought to have a late-4th ceiling until he blew up the Combine. How much credit does athletic testing deserve?

3:12

MACK ILB Blake "Johnny" Cashman, Minnesota. 6'1⅛", 237 lbs. He quite literally dashed onto the radar after a remarkable Combine where this little known, high motor, former walk on recorded the third best SPARQ core of the ILB class, good enough to be in the 90th percentile for the whole NFL. Could two shoulder injuries have held back from showing his full ability? Start your research with this gif-supported scouting report from The Draft Network, which lauds his vision and confirms that the physical assets show up on tape (along with the T-rex arm length). It ends with a Top 100 (Round 3) grade. The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as "not big and not fast" (guess the testing proved that part wrong) but likes his demeanor enough for a decent grade anyway.

3:12

MACK ILB Terrill Hanks, N.M. State. 6'2", 234 lbs. As summarized in this Senior Bowl scouting profile, Hanks has almost-a-Safety skills as a coverage linebacker, but also almost-an-ILB when it comes to all the run support duties. Should be a good special teamer soon but will need at least a year of strength- and technique training before he has any shot at playing actual defense. Sounds a lot like L.J. Fort as a prospect but a bit ahead and boasting great leadership skills. Rose significantly after a tremendous Senior Bowl week proved his range, speed and leadership ability, then fell a bit after pulling a hammy in his miserable 4.98 dash at the Combine. The SPARQ score would be in the NFL's 7th percentile, but everyone seems to agree that his pretty good 60th percentile leaps are more consistent with the explosiveness seen on film. This admiring gif-supported scouting report ends with a Day 2 grade. He was also discussed in Nick Farabaugh's February BTSC pre-Combine article on favorite ILB prospects. The NFL.com scouting profile worries about his athleticism in space.

3:12

MACK ILB David Long, W. Va. {Visit}. 5'11¼", 227 lbs. Look at the scouting report for Devin Bush, slow him down from fantastic to excellent both athletically and in the processing department, remove any tackling technique, and then you'll have local product David Long. He has the assets to succeed in the NFL as an undersized, cover capable ILB. Consider things like a 4.45 dash and great leaps reported in the NFL.com scouting profile. But for now it is all potential and getting there will take some work. Here is a gif-supported scouting report along with the Draft Network scouting profiles.

3:12

MACK ILB Bobby Okereke, Stanford. 6'1⅜", 239 lbs. with arms like vines. Okereke is Stanford smart and as cover-capable as almost any linebacker in the draft, but not as crisp on tackling and physicality as you might prefer (close to poor) and hasn't shown true field general characteristics yet. He also plays as if he was much faster than he is explosive, taking 3-4 steps to get up to what looks like an impressive top speed. Came in bigger than expected at the Combine and showed above average athleticism at that weight, but strength - his bugaboo, as confirmed by the NFL.com scouting profile - remains an issue. A very divisive prospect. The Draft Network scouting profiles identify tackling as a major thing he'll need to work on.

3:12

MACK ILB Germaine Pratt, N.C. State. 6'2⅝", 240 lbs. A converted Safety with the size and attitude of a true ILB, and who covers pretty well... for a linebacker. A productive 1-year starter, he brings a lot of the assets that Pittsburgh is looking for but his actual linebacker skills are as raw as you'd expect. Getting off blocks is a particular challenge and it will no doubt take him a while to build his football IQ. Some fans may also question his dedication, since he skipped his bowl game and likes to play the social media ‘money, money, money' game. As always, it is best to start off with a gif-supported BTSC scouting report like this January one from Nick Farabaugh. He was also discussed in Nick Farabaugh's February BTSC pre-Combine article on favorite ILB prospects. Here is another pre-Senior Bowl gif-supported scouting report. The athletic measurables show great speed but limited explosion for a good but not exceptional SPARQ score. To your author's eye he looked a bit mechanical in many of the Combine on-field drills, which echoes some of the concerns mentioned in the NFL.com scouting profile. He did not do the C.O.D. tests, which would have been particularly useful to answer questions raised in the Draft Network scouting profiles.

3:12

MACK ILB Cameron Smith, USC. 6'2", 238 lbs. A four year starter renowned for his high football IQ and quick processing speed. He's a complete package with the speed, coverage ability, tackling and explosiveness required to play the position but tempered by a bad case of being too aggressive. Ohio State killed him with misdirection plays and fakes that moved him wherever the offense desired, and he didn't shine at the Senior Bowl either. An excellent Combine showed top-quarter-of-the-NFL athleticism that's given him a mild bump. The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as "smart and steady." Here is a gif-supported scouting report, and the Draft Network scouting profile.

3:12

SS/FS Marquise Blair, Utah. 6'1¼", 195 lbs. One of the more intriguing developmental projects of the draft, Blair is a height/weight/speed project who seems to have a number of significant but coachable flaws in his game. He is eager and physical in the box but takes inconsistent angles and tackles with inconsistent technique; has great range but looks vulnerable in man coverage; very aggressive in the box but plays overly cautious as a center fielder... You get the idea. Interviews will be key because Safeties require such high football IQ's to do the NFL job. Injury bit in prior years but fine in 2018. Lance Zierlein's NFL.com scouting profile is especially complimentary, saying that despite a slender frame "he's long and rangy in coverage, and embodies the mindset that defensive coordinators want from their units." A solid top 40% SPARQ score at a bigger than expected weight does nothing but support the argument that he could be a great puzzle piece for a Pittsburgh team that needs a backup for Sean Davis.

3:12

CB Jamel Dean, Auburn. 6'1", 206 lbs. A pure boom or bust prospect with great athletic traits like a 4.30 dash at the Combine and enough comparable numbers to score in the 98th SPARQ score percentile. The athleticism is real but there is no film and little technique to support it because his career has been crippled (so far) by an ACL & meniscus in 2014 (High School) and then an ACL tear on the other knee in 2016. He managed to stay mostly healthy in 2017 and 2018, and looked promising but still undeveloped. The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as being very raw from a technical standpoint and in need of some added fire, but a very real height/weight/speed prospect nevertheless. The Draft Network scouting profiles project him as a decent press-man prospect who is limited to that approach.

3:12

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Yodny Cajuste, W. Va. 6'4⅞", 312 lbs. His footwork could definitely improve but that is coachable and he'd be a late-1st prospect in most drafts who is probably a 2nd-rounder in this one. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile (less complimentary than most) and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

3:12

QB Dwayne Haskins, Ohio St. 6'3⅜", 231 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen. Haskins has "rough edges" but his potential and big arm will push him into the top-10 of a weak QB class.

3:12

QB Kyler Murray, Oklahoma. 5'10⅛", 207 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen. The 2018 Heisman Trophy winner is an electric playmaker who will be amazingly small as an NFL QB. He is likely to be a first round pick but it is hard to see the Steelers being interested with Dobbs and Rudolph on roster.

3:12

WR Gary Jennings, W. Va. 6'1", 214 lbs. A straight up solid football player with excellent film and a surprisingly good Combine performance that put him in the top quarter of NFL receivers from a SPARQ score POV. Lance Zierlein will be just one of the many reviewers scurrying to see how those results square up with his tape review in the NFL.com scouting profile. He has shown the ability to create separation and our own Nick Farabaugh describes him as "the classic possession receiver" while this article on his excellent Senior Bowl week emphasizes "the size and speed to be an ideal vertical threat in the NFL." Hmmm.

3:12

WR Denzel Mims, Baylor. 6'3", 207 lbs. A contested catch specialist with the explosive ability to break almost any catch into a TD, held back by still-developing skills as a route runner.

3:12

WR Anthony Ratliff-Williams, North Carolina. 6'1", 205 lbs. Raw as meat that runs away when it hears you in the forest, but good luck catching this particular deer. This Draft Network scouting profile attests that he has flashed top notch traits at almost everything, but also needs to improve and be more consistent at all the same things. A fine kick returner who shows that skill after the catch as well, and also loves to block. He's an athlete rather than football player at the WR position, make no mistake about it, but he could easily grow to be a true WR1.

3:12

WR Riley Ridley, Georgia {Meeting at Combine}. 6'2", 200 lbs. Calvin Ridley's little brother is the best pure route runner and one of the most polished overall receivers in the draft. The questions go to his top end speed (4.58), acceleration, and overall athleticism (if not for his size and broad jump the athletic profile would be a disaster). In a lot of ways he projects like a poor man's James Washington: a WR2/3 and a floor at WR4. These links go to the Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, all of which emphasize that he is much better getting open and catching the ball than gaining yards after the catch. This pre-Combine, gif-supported scouting report ends with a fringe-2nd grade. This gif-supported scouting report from December illustrates why tape alone makes Ridley look better than tape plus the draft process nitpicking. Jon Ledyard, a Steelers fan, included him as one of 5 Combine heartbreakers.

Steelers Pick at 3:19

3:24

DL/NT Dexter Lawrence, Clemson. 6'4½", 342 lbs. with long 34¾" arms and big 10½" hands. The best two-down, run stuffing immovable object in the class, Lawrence combines his size with good pad level but no pass rush to speak of. He earns major discounts for both the limited utility Pittsburgh would get from a pure run stuffer, however good, and also for a PED issue in December. Fans should argue that his ideal weight would be in the 320's and getting there might make him more explosive, which is a valid but speculative point. Like most scouting profiles, the Draft Network pages view him as the clearly best 0-tech Nose Tackle in the draft but no more than that. The NFL.com scouting profile gives him an "instant starter" grade on the understanding that two-down NT's are still to be seen as ‘starters.'

3:24

DL Gerald Willis, Miami. 6'1¾", 302 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles, including a particularly good one from Jon Ledyard, describe a player who is explosive and strong, but has severe pad level problems. He has a sky high ceiling if good coaching can help him to fix that. His backstory can cut both ways. The Bad: he displayed terrible team- and self-destructive immaturity early in his college career. The Good: he took a voluntary year off, came back, and proceeded to earn glowing reports from everyone on his newfound locker room demeanor and work ethic. A 2018 hand injury kept him out of the Bowl game. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February ends with a Round 4-5 grade.

3:24

SS/FS Will Harris, Boston College. 6'1", 207 lbs. A fluid and rangy athlete who can fly over the field and, as a converted WR, has fantastic ball skills as well. He was one of the major athletic achievers of this class with a top 20% SPARQ score that centered heavily on movement skills. The NFL.com scouting profile adds that he has some ability to cover TE's and perhaps some of the oversized slot WR's, but then downgrades him significantly for a variety of processing issues that come under headings like "poor instincts". Translation: he has a safe floor as a special teams player, but will have to grow a lot before he earns defensive snaps and even more before he approaches the "boom" potential his pure athletic talents would support. He stood out well at the Shrine Game.

3:24

CB Lonnie Johnson, Jr., Kentucky. 6'1⅞", 213 lbs. (6'2¼", 210 lbs. at the Senior Bowl). A long, physical Corner with athletic upside offset by bad tape and scheme limitations. The film is so bad that he started the process with a Round 4-5 grade. The stock rose because of a noteworthy performance at the Senior Bowl followed by a Combine that revealed an impressive athletic profile based on good speed, great leaps, and surprising agility that add up to a 90th percentile SPARQ score. He projects far better to the Seahawks'-type system that suited Richard Sherman so well and may be unsuited to anything else. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. A JUCO transfer, this local (and probably biased) scouting profile describes a prospect with startling COD skills for a kid that tall, good ball skills, and points out that he can even return kicks at that height. OTOH, if all of that was literally true he would have a splashier reputation than ‘another of those big Kentucky CB prospects.' And then there's the lousy tape... Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles page and a good NFL.com scouting profile. This pre-Combine gif-supported scouting report sounds cautionary notes about the amount of technique work he will require before he can play at an NFL level.

3:24

CB Joejuan Williams, Vanderbilt. 6'3⅝", 211 lbs. The size is real, and awesome. And while you'd think he was a pure press-man talent with that profile, his best technique in college was actually off-man because his reaction time is surprisingly good and the distance helps to cover 4.64 recovery speed. But the film is notably up and down, highlighted by shutting down some great Ole Miss deep threats (Lodge, Brown) and getting destroyed by Georgia's shiftier group (Ridley, Hardman, Godwin). He is arguably the best of the Richard Sherman wannabes - a comparison enhanced by this detail: his college coach (Marc Mattioli) worked with Sherman at Stanford. Really good ball- and tackling skills enhance his prospects. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. This November scouting profile by Jon Ledyard worried about his 40 time, which has proved to be a real concern. The NFL.com scouting profile notes that he "makes splashy plays and gives them up." This February DraftWire scouting profile ends with a Round 3 grade. This mid-February scouting profile (and the comments) from our sister site for the Redskins isn't bad. This goes to a fun, pre-Combine article. This mid-March, gif-heavy, Steelers-oriented scouting report catches the essential point that he plays well against size and speed (with some provisos) but can be totally flummoxed by pure quickness, and thus has to be paired with the right defensive scheme.

3:24

TE Foster Moreau, LSU {Meeting at Senior Bowl}. 6'4⅛", 253 lbs. A "feisty and committed run blocker" according to the NFL.com scouting profile, Moreau isn't yet the pass protector he should be and needs a lot of work on his route running. The tape raised doubts about his native athletic talent in that regard but he blew those questions away with a tremendous Combine performance that put him in the NFL top-10% SPARQ score bracket for TE's. Even better, it was a well-rounded athletic display with no real holes. It reminds me a lot of the draft process evolution we saw with George Kittle. Best of all, Moreau was tough and gritty enough to earn the coveted #18 uniform for "a player who exemplifies LSU football," and stood out as an overall energy bringer and special teams demon. Bottom line: Moreau has every chance to stick in the league and could develop into a star. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from early February. This gif-supported Draft Network scouting report came out just after the Combine performance and points out that his athletic scores are supported by film flashes if you look a bit more carefully. This goes to a decent, if hometown biased article gloating about the Combine results. This January, Jags-oriented scouting profile is worth a read because it focuses on his Senior Bowl rather than his later Combine. There is more than just an athlete here.

3:24

TE Kahale Warring, S. Dakota St. 6'5⅛", 252 lbs. A latecomer to the position with the basketball-type skills you look for, Warring earned an NFL.com scouting profile comparison to Todd Heap and then delivered a sterling Combine (80th percentile SPARQ score) with no particular athletic holes. The Draft Network scouting profiles are equally complimentary, with praise for all aspects of his game and especially for his work ethic and toughness. Definitely a prospect to keep an eye on.

3:24

RB Josh Jacobs, Alabama. 5'10", 220 lbs. Grade dropped significantly to reflect lack of need. The #1 Running Back on most Boards and a fringe-1st talent, Jacobs is an electric playmaker who can break any run with pure speed and still deliver the wood on impact. There is not a lot of film to show his prowess in pass protection but he has looked like an able receiver when used that way. Jacobs also comes with one of those tough, poverty-stricken backstories that make you believe in his fundamental grit. Here is a solid write-up from the Luke Easterling at DraftWire. These go to the several Draft Network scouting profiles and to an NFL.com scouting profile that ends with an "instant starter" grade. He did not test well at his pro day to support his stock, nor badly enough to knock it down.

3:24

WR Miles Boykin, Notre Dame {Visit}. 6'3¾", 220 lbs. Boykin almost literally flew up draft boards across the country after an astounding Combine performance that put him in the 99.9th SPARQ score percentile at the very summit of this year's class, even ahead of D.K. Metcalf and Parris Campbell. The only test he didn't excel at was the bench press! As a football player, the NFL.com scouting profile describes a prospect who possesses all the tools but hasn't learned to use his size, and has accordingly been vulnerable to all kinds of physicality from the opposing Corner. Those tend to be learnable skills, however, while height, weight and speed are not. Here are what promises to be the first of many post-Combine film studies and pie-in-the-sky dream profiles. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from March ends in a Round 3 grade based on a very high ceiling in need of a great deal of coaching. Here is a brief but okay scouting profile from a 49ers perspective. Part 2 of Geoffrey Benedict's Big WR series examines his film in more detail.

3:24

WR DaMarkus Lodge, Ole Miss. 6'1⅞", 202 lbs. Maybe the single biggest loser at the Combine, Lodge was expected to show the serious, deep threat speed and corresponding athleticism he displayed in college. Instead he ran a 4.55 dash, did even worse in the agility drills, and compiled an overall SPARQ score good (bad?) for the bottom fifth of the league. The tape is still good. He has the fine body control to twist and contort for catches, and seemed to answer any questions about his hands with a fine performance during Shrine Game week. He's also been described as the best route runner of the Ole Miss trio, with a particular ability to get clean at the top of his routes. But is there an upside worth betting on in light of that testing? The Draft Network scouting profiles recognize the incredible peaks, including some circus catches, but warn of equally bad concentration drops. The NFL.com scouting profile says exactly the same things. Jon Ledyard, a Steelers fan, included him as one of 5 Combine heartbreakers. Here are a pre-Combine scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants, and a January scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins. This goes to a gif-supported March scouting report that ends with a fringe-3rd grade.

3:24

WR Darius Slayton, Auburn. 6'1",190 lbs. A superb deep threat who has both highly explosive jets and long speed afterburners but is for now less good as a receiver than he is as a (97th percentile SPARQ score) athlete. The Draft Network scouting profiles identify concentration drops as an issue but that is fixable and the tools are there. The NFL.com scouting profile concurs: "he's more than just a field stretcher and has the traits and talent to become a WR2/3 with more work". This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report basically agrees: a one trick pony with a really good trick, who will never be more than that if he can't learn to make the difficult and often contested catches he'll need to in the NFL.

4:01

DL/NT Daylon Mack, Texas A&M. 6'1", 327 lbs. A 5-star recruit who fizzled and underperformed through his college career until he suddenly started to get it in the back end of 2018. A dazzling and dominant performance at the Shrine Game started buzz to the effect that he's finally arrived. The Senior Bowl only pushed the buzz up. Could Daylon Mack be the defensive line steal of the draft with so many obvious superstar prospects to absorb the DL picks in Rounds 1 and 2? Maybe. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report describes a straight line, explosive run stuffer who will occasionally push the pocket when his bull rush wins. The Draft Network scouting profile agrees on both the description and the mid-round grade.

4:01

DL Khalen Saunders, W. Illinois. 6'⅜", 324 pounds. Want a small school superstar who first hit this Board for a very good reason having nothing to do with football? Watch this and you won't even think of disagreeing. Last time I saw something like that it was Jason Pierre-Paul at the Combine, and he turned out okay... Senior Bowl practice reports lauded his "rare blend of power and quickness," and then he dominated the game as well. Here is The Draft Network scouting profiles page, along with a gif-supported scouting report ("Khalen Saunders does rare things"). This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile, which raises concerns about his ability to anchor. For all the press we have to remember that Khalen Saunders comes from a small school, needs a lot of work with both NFL coaches and NFL training staffs, and may turn out to be an extraordinarily well-wired athlete who isn't as straight-line explosive as you could wish for. Bad leaps and very moderate length kept his overall SPARQ score at middle-of-the-road status.

4:01

EDGE Jaylon Ferguson, La. Tech. 6'4⅜", 256 lbs. Incredible, record-setting sack production. That's the bottom line. He's discounted because he (a) padded the stats a bit by feasting on some inferior competition, and (b) will fit much, much better a 4-3 scheme. The Draft Network scouting profiles describes him as a less athletic but more refined version of what Bud Dupree has become: a strong, edge holding, but linear athlete with good burst (not as good as Bud's) and excellent hands (even better than Bud's). The downsides are very little bend and less than ideal athleticism in space (much worse than Bud). The NFL.com scouting profile is more positive and ends in an "instant starter" grade, but only for a 4-3 team that uses him in the right way. This gif-supported December scouting report ends with an early Day 2 grade based on excellent hand usage. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported January scouting report ends with a Round 4-6 grade for a team like Pittsburgh that asks its Edge rushers to drop into coverage.

4:01

EDGE Justin Hollins, Oregon {Meeting at the shrine game}. 6'5¼", 248 lbs. His calling card is strength and he also has some explosion to his game, but Hollins is exceedingly raw as a pass rusher and suffers from moderate bend. That combination projects him as an ideal run stopper with some coverage skills (he played 3-4 OLB in college and did this acceptably), nice versatility, and some theoretical upside. More Bud Dupree than TJ Watt. Rose up a bit after a great week at the Shrine Game where he won a lot more than most in the 1-on-1 challenges and also did well in space. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February. This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile.

4:01

MACK ILB E.J. Ejiya, North Texas. 6'3", 231 lbs. The small school sleeper of the draft at ILB, Ejiya led the Mean Green defense for the past two years as one of those LBs who impacts everything on the field. He was uber-productive and was seemingly always around the ball due to nice athleticism. He is a clear leader, but his instincts and processing are issues that will need to be fixed at the next level, especially coming from such a small school. The potential, however, is there. He was discussed in Nick Farabaugh's February BTSC pre-Combine article on favorite ILB prospects.

4:01

MACK ILB Ulysses Gilbert III, Akron {Visit}. 6'1", 229 lbs. Elite quickness and play speed that comes from a combination of native athleticism, pure competitiveness and confidence in his reads. The downsides are the low level of competition, a serious need to fill out his frame in an NFL weight room, trouble defeating blockers who make it to the second level, and some inconsistencies sifting through the trash. He might fit better as a 4-3 Will OLB than a 3-4 Mack ILB, but the latter is what he'd be in Pittsburgh. His standout Shrine Game performance led to both this brief Raiders-oriented scouting profile and this scouting profile from that SB Nation site for the Bengals. This goes to a summary scouting profile from a Bleacher Report article on draft sleepers. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report.

4:01

MACK ILB Vosean Joseph, Florida. 6'1½", 230 lbs. An athletic player who puts it all together on some days, and on others can look like the biggest liability on the field. Why the inconsistency? Here is a gif-supported scouting report from January. The Draft Network scouting profile suggests a limitation in the all important area of football IQ. The NFL.com scouting report offers what might be the perfect summary: "a narrow, underweight linebacker with excellent athleticism and outstanding closing burst but a maddening amount of negative tape."

4:01

BUCK ILB Sutton Smith, N. Illinois. 6'⅜", 233 lbs. Sutton provokes heated debates because he is a man without a position; an Edge player who lived off his bend and hand work in college but is just too small to do it in the pros (as proven in Senior Bowl week). OTOH, he has an exceptionally high floor because he has some real athletic talent and everyone seems to agree he will be a special teams superstar. The foreseeable ceiling is described in the Draft Network's comparison to Joe Schobert, Cleveland's fringe all-pro. The NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes the need to change his position.

4:01

CB/FS Isaiah Johnson, Houston. 6'2¼", 207 lbs. Just like Brian Allen a few years ago, Johnson is a long, speedy, physical SPARQ score wonder who recently converted from WR and hopes to become a "Richard Sherman-like" Corner. Indeed, he was called a "Pete Carroll prototype" during the Combine coverage. His ferocity in run support earns a higher grade than the question marks would normally deserve. A poor Senior Bowl week highlighted the movement limitations and the odds that he won't succeed in the NFL outside of a coverage scheme that would limit his lack of lateral mobility. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. This pre-Combine, Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report sees him as an excellent Round 4 target.

4:01

OL//GUARD/CENTER Michael Deiter, Wisconsin. 6'5⅛", 309 lbs. Very strong, technically sound and exceptionally good at pulling. Built like a shorter-armed Tackle but may be more comfortable inside because he has some issues with really fast edge rushers; though he has the potential to play across the line if coaching can help him develop a deeper pass set for the edge. He confirms that Tackle is probably out in this January interview. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles. The NFL.com scouting profile likes the technique and strength but questions the athleticism (bottom 25% SPARQ score). Deiter gets some good discussion in the comments section of this January scouting profile on his teammate from our sister site for the Giants. Had a fine Senior Bowl week.

4:01

OL/GUARD/CENTER Connor Mcgovern, Penn St. 6'5⅜", 308 lbs. with long 34⅛" arms. Big, strong and with the native athleticism to be even more mobile than he was in college, the NFL.com scouting profile suggests that Mcgovern would slot right into the inside zone and gap schemes favored by the Steelers. Here is the Draft Network scouting profiles page as well.

4:01

TE Keenan Brown, Texas State. 6'3", 250 lbs. Brown is the definition of a rock solid TE2 with the potential to become even more. Here is a good article on how he was recruited to be a star "big WR" at Oklahoma State and ended up outgrowing the position and moving to a school closer to home. Brown has never lost his ability to run routes and catch the ball; he is still nimble enough to break the occasional play; and unlike the Outlaw he would come to the NFL as a superb in-line blocker. His stock will go way up if the Steelers move on from Jesse James. Our own Nick Farabaugh included Brown in this pre-Combine article on sleepers to watch for. This goes to the NFL.com scouting profile. The Combine coverage described him as a "sneaky good athlete" who is crafty, good on special teams, and projects best as a multi-faceted H-back who'd survive but not thrive in-line. His results were okay, not great, but heavily weighted toward length (not height), speed and explosiveness.

4:01

TE Isaac Nauta, Georgia. 6'3¼", 244 lbs. Excellent tape made his floor look like an NFL quality, multifaceted TE2 with TE1 aspirations, but then he bombed the athletic testing at the Combine (SPARQ score in the bottom two percentile) badly enough to raise new questions, especially about his speed and the apparent lack of a second gear. He improved the time marginally at his pro day, from a hideous 4.91 to a bad 4.81.OTOH, his film displays a fairly well rounded game with the ability to both block at a college level and to find holes in a zone defense. But does he have that special something extra? This pre-Combine gif-supported Draft Network scouting report and the NFL.com scouting profile both concluded that he is a very good athlete with a rounded game whose floor is TE2, but that testing.... Nauta, Sternberger, Knox, and Raymond were the four interchangeable Round 3 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard, with only Fant, Hockenson and Irv Smith, Jr. ahead of them. But that testing... Jon Ledyard, a Steelers fan, included him as one of 5 Combine heartbreakers.

4:01

TE Josh Oliver, San Jose St. 6'4½", 246 lbs. A good but not brilliant athlete (the athletic profile is shockingly similar to Gronkowski for what that's worth) who won in college by "being bigger and faster than everyone at his current competition level," Oliver may well fall into the Steelers' hands because he is desperately raw and will require at least a year of coaching before those assets will show up against NFL defenders. The NFL.com scouting profile basically agrees that the potential is real but the skills will need serious work. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting profile from January. Combine watchers got to see him make a remarkable one-handed adjustment grab on the wheel route drill, where he also displayed his speed, explosiveness and smooth athletic talent.

4:01

TE Dax Raymond, Utah St. 6'4¾", 255 lbs. A good receiving TE with the build but not the skill to play in-line and good but not exceptional athletic skills. Sounds a lot like Jesse James Mark II except for his age: he will be a 25 year old rookie. His 2018 results were crippled by a broken hand suffered a month or so in but it should be okay for his rookie season. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles, the NFL.com scouting profile, and a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported January scouting report. Raymond, Sternberger, Knox, and Nauta were the four interchangeable Round 3 TE grades awarded in this nice article by Jon Ledyard, with only Fant, Hockenson and Irv Smith, Jr. ahead of them. The Combine results consistently showed speed and C.O.D. assets but limited strength and explosion.

4:01

RB Justice Hill, Okla. St. {Meeting at Combine}. 5'9⅝", 198 lbs. A really fine overall prospect who's just a bit smaller than you'd hope, which forces him to wriggle, twist, and squirm through tiny cracks rather than moving the pile. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile, which the authors will probably revisit because they nitpick mostly on athleticism and ‘pop' questions that Hill answered resoundingly with a best-of-class 95th percentile SPARQ score based on a 4.40 dash, a fantastic 1.48 10 yard split, and leaps that prove his explosiveness beyond any doubt. He gets mention as a big winner in this post-Combine BTSC article on the RB class.

4:01

RB David Montgomery, Iowa St. 5'10⅛", 222 lbs. He needs to work on his receiving and had a terrible Combine (very moderate speed and awful leaps), but on film David Montgomery is a Steady Eddie performer who fits the Steeler mold to a tee: tough, hard running, patient, and hard to bring down. This October scouting profile describes him as "a shiftier version of James Conner," a description this gif-supported October scouting report and this gif-supported February scouting report would agree with. The Draft Network scouting profiles universally praise his extraordinary contact balance. The NFL.com scouting profile, which grades him as the #2 RB in the class, adds praise for "natural hands" and "Good blitz recognition in pass pro." But what's up with the testing? The film just doesn't look like a bottom 20% SPARQ score guy. Could he be another ‘lose a few pounds for burst' Steelers RB target?

4:01

RB Miles Sanders, Penn St. {Visit}. 5'10⅝", 211 lbs. A big play threat with good speed and great agility who's also a decent blocker, Sanders struggled to get out from under the looooong shadow of Saquan Barkley until a great Combine that earned him in a top 20% SPARQ score and displayed the best field drills in the class. The cautionary notes go to inconsistent vision and unproven ability as a receiver. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from February. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

4:01

WR Lil' Jordan Humphrey, Texas. 6'4", 225 lbs. A "junkyard dog at WR" who can grab anything out of the air and would battle hell itself to do so, Humphrey has been both a red zone monster and a big play threat in college, but his lack of speed and limited route tree drop his grade from an NFL perspective. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from early March that complains about some horribly inconsistent hands. The Draft Network scouting profiles emphasize a surprisingly good RAC ability. The athletic profile is heavy on size and length but very light on anything else.

4:01

WR Jalen Hurd, Baylor. 6'4¾", 227 lbs. Stop! Read this article at NFL.com about how this all-star RB on the eve of NFL draft glory walked out of Tennessee, transferred to Baylor, and started all over again at a new position. I mean it! You can't understand this prospect without understanding the backstory. The assets are all there and his season as a WR shows that he really can play the position. No known issues with any of the physical things like hands and ability to separate, willingness to block, or (lord knows) run after catch. He often gets compared to a bigger Cordarrelle Patterson if that will help. The "flaws" are all about that backstory and the year or two it will take for a genius athlete to fully master a new position. The NFL.com scouting profile gives a good, somewhat positive overview. Here is a New Year's scouting profile that covers the physical and technical assets and issues. But the backstory is what you need to know. This early March, gif-supported scouting report ends with a Round 5 grade based on all the rawness. Part 2 of Geoffrey Benedict's Big WR series examines his film in more detail.

4:01

WR Terry McLaurin, Ohio St. 6'0", 205 lbs. This pre-Senior Bowl scouting reports made McLaurin sound like a decent WR3 who could legitimately hope to be a #2; relatively pro ready, Ohio-State-level as an overall athlete, and darned shifty but nothing special in any other way. Then he killed the Senior Bowl practice week and is now being compared to a young Nate Burleson (despite one diving miss that could have been a TD in the game). Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles. This good, gif-supported, Steeler-oriented scouting report identifies a legitimate flaw; he tends to be a body catcher and doesn't high point the ball well for that reason.

4:01

WR Preston Williams, Colorado St. 6'4", 210 lbs. His stock would be a bit higher if not for vague rumors about "character" issues. These seem to rise from a misdemeanor assault charge (later dropped) that nevertheless got him barred from the Combine, and whatever it was that made him decide to leave Tennessee (unknown). He also lost his 2017 season to a now-healed ACL injury. But talentwise he is up there at the top of the class with assets including the obvious height, good speed, much better agility than a man that size should have, and a genuine knack for getting open. The main flaw is trouble getting off press coverage, overall raw technique, and a need to enhance physicality. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles. This goes to an interesting video scouting report from Matt Waldman. This is a nice summary scouting profile from when he declared for the draft.

4:16

DL Trysten Hill, UCF. 6'2¾", 308 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles make you think of a much more raw version of Javon Hargrave. The explosion, agility and potential are there but he will need some serious coaching before he could really help - particularly when it comes to keeping his pads down and using his hands. Those skills will be essential for him to (a) function in the NFL and (b) make use of his natural advantages when it comes to leverage. His other big asset is a white hot, neverending motor. Hill was one of two players featured in Jon Ledyard's February article on mid-round DL sleepers, which also suggested a Round 4 grade. He got a bump from an excellent Combine that put his SPARQ score in the NFL's top 20% and yielded reports of good interviews. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile, which questions his coachability and makes those interviews even more important.

4:16

EDGE Jordan Brailford, Oklahoma St. {Visit}. 6'2½", 252 lbs. Summing up, Brailford profiles like a slightly more explosive Anthony Chickillo held back by a history of injury problems like a broken leg. He stood out as a real star of the Shrine Game. At the Combine he put up a top 17% SPARQ score based purely on speed and explosion numbers because he did not do the C.O.D. drills (which Chickillo excelled at FWIW). The NFL.com scouting profile praises his effort, motor and burst; complains of missed tackles and a variety of technical flaws that coaching might be able to fix; and ends with a mid-round developmental grade. The Draft Network scouting profiles as more of a Round 5-7 prospect with good upside. This gif-supported scouting report from our sister site for the Redskins sees instead an unpolished but supremely versatile athlete who can play multiple Edge and LB positions. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report basically describes a multifaceted Buck ILB.

4:16

MACK ILB Drue Tranquill, Notre Dame. 6'2", 234 lbs. A 88th percentile SPARQ score at the Combine based on almost-great testing in all the athletic areas but size. Those exceptional results probably shocked a lot of analysts because athleticism was the major question mark pointed to by multiple sources such as the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles. Those film watchers all saw Tranquill as a 100% football player who'd be doomed to special teams duty by limited speed and mobility - factors that have now flipped in his favor. What could have caused it? This article on his recent marriage points out that Tranquill tore his left knee ACL in 2014, and then his right in 2015. One suspects that he is only now getting his full mobility back. This January article emphasizes his tremendous locker room character, grit, versatility, and off-field characteristics. His stock would be higher without the injury red flags and the fact that he will be a 24 year old rookie. Definitely a kid you root for.

4:16

SS Mike Edwards, Kentucky {Pre-draft visit}. 5'10½", 205 lbs. A solid and versatile Safety who has played every DB position on a good unit over the past several years. The assets include good coverage skills (for a Safety) and enough speed to play Cover-2, but he's an average athlete overall and probably not fast enough to play single-high if Sean Davis goes down. The NFL.com scouting profile applauds his potential to play Nickel Corner against big receivers at one moment and then Cover-2 the next, while cautioning that he won't be special at either. The Draft Network scouting profiles similarly laud his versatility, attitude, and heart, along with his plus ball skills and football IQ. This gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report from January concurs up and down the line: an experienced, versatile, Steelerish player with plus ball skills, coverage ability and football IQ, but limited speed and athleticism. Same for this Raiders-oriented scouting report from December, this similar New Years scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins, and the Eagles-oriented February scouting profile buried in this article by Ben Solak. This February scouting profile explains that a broken thumb prevented full participation at the Combine.

4:16

SS Jaquan Johnson, Miami. 5'10⅜", 186 lbs. He's a bit on the small side but only physically. Jaquan Johnson is one of those do-everything team leaders and overachievers who just make plays while floating all other boats that much higher. If his body holds up he will be an inevitable fan favorite and secondary anchor for whatever NFL franchise he lands at. But that's not a small "if" for this kind of living missile. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report ends with a Round 5 grade based on viewing him as a pure box Safety. The Draft Network scouting profiles also views him as a likely phenom for special teams who will have trouble finding snaps in the actual defense.

4:16

SS/FS Sheldrick Redwine, Miami. 6'0", 196 lbs. A tremendous athlete (94th percentile SPARQ score) and former Corner who can play both Free and Strong Safety. The athleticism is real, with especially good explosion and speed results, but it did not always show up on tape. The NFL.com scouting profile notes that he is a former Corner with good hands and aggressiveness, but dings him for relatively slow processing (to be expected from someone new to the position) and consistency issues. This goes to a February scouting profile from our sister site for the Cowboys, which ends in a Round 4 grade. This gif-supported February scouting profile from a Raiders POV also ends in a Round 4 grade. This Steelers-oriented, gif-supported March scouting report ends in more of a Round 5-6 grade.

4:16

FS Evan Worthington, Colorado. 6'1⅞", 212 lbs. The tape shows a very long and fast single-high Free Safety who can tackle. The speed and length let him cover TE's and some big WR's too but reports suggest that shifty quickness can beat him pretty easily. He played Strong Safety as a Junior (good versatility that way) but was suspended for all of 2016 due to an undisclosed violation of team rules. This very useful 2017 article details how he came back from that with a new name, dedication, family and maturity. This gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report from March emphasizes his game speed as the primary asset. His 4.63 dash at the Combine did not reflect that, but the 4.53 at his pro day comes closer. The Draft Network scouting profiles question the football IQ more than the range. The NFL.com scouting profile seems to agree with the general picture: excellent length and speed; good tools; needs to prove he's over the maturity issues; and could do with some enhanced ferocity and football IQ.

4:16

CB Derrick Baity, Kentucky. 6'2⅛", 197 lbs. Long, tall, and physical, but does he have the fluidity and change of direction to keep up with the shiftier ones, or the speed to recover if he loses at the line? In the ideal world he grows into Richard Sherman. In the expected world his odds aren't good and he will have even more issues if asked to play in a system where his limitations would be even more exposed. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. The NFL.com scouting profile identifies lack of recovery speed as a major question mark, which makes his failure to run at the Combine a bit disturbing.

4:16

CB/FS Kris Boyd, Texas. 5'11½", 195 lbs. Feisty, aggressive, savvy and in-your-face with coverage built on basic technique. The drawbacks? Reviewers differ distinctly on whether (a) his COD skills are good or barely average, (b) his speed is good enough to avoid getting burned deep, (c) his tendency to grab when he's beat can be cured, and (d) his are only okay or Ike Taylor bad. All agree that he has an excellent football IQ, supports the run as well as many Safeties, and would fit best in a zone-heavy defensive scheme. This one's in the eye of the beholder for sure! The Combine definitely helped his stock by proving good speed (4.45), overall athletic talent (SPARQ score in the NFL's 87th percentile), and no particular athletic holes. A stream of Senior Bowl penalties and a poor practice week significantly lowered his stock. The NFL.com scouting profile considers him a good enough prospect but limited to zone coverage schemes and with even better prospects as a Safety.

4:16

CB Sean Bunting, Central Michigan {Visit}. 6'⅜", 195 lbs. Another prospect with all the physical tools but little evidence that he can learn how to use them. 93rd percentile SPARQ score based on major speed, length and explosiveness, but it appears that his very small college left a lot of gaps in his fundamentals and football IQ. I suggest starting with this careful post-Combine scouting profile Fanpost from our sister site for the Raiders. This Draft Network scouting profile emphasizes his lack of physicality but sees a high ceiling based on traits. This mid-March Bleacher Report article says he "has proven he can play in man coverage" but at what level? The NFL.com scouting profile describes a "bail or trail corner... [who's] a solid Day 3 prospect with CB4 potential."

4:16

CB Tim Harris, Virginia. 6'1", 205 lbs. As described in this January article on his tremendous Shrine Game week, Harris is a young man with all the measurables and very good tape, but also a long history of miscellaneous injuries (shoulder, broken wrist, back) that have delayed his maturation. The assets and the sound technique displayed at the Shrine Game make for a Day 3 prospect with real upside.

4:16

CB Donnie Lewis, Tulane. 6'0", 194 lbs. An experienced senior standout who projects best to a zone and off-man scheme, but has the length to also grow into a press-man CB. The issues are a frame that lacks strength and hands that might be even worse than Ike Taylor's. This description from the Shrine Game describes him as, "[an energy bringer who] stood out as a physical player who is eager to accept any challenge thrown his way."

4:16

CB Brian Peavy, Iowa St. 5'9", 185 lbs. Add 3-4" and he'd be in the conversation for Round 1, especially given the great experience and stats compiled against wide open Big 12 offenses. But the size simply isn't there and that limits him to being a prospect that might become a better version of Mike Hilton. A notorious Combine snub.

4:16

OL/GUARD Nate Davis, UNC Charlotte. 6'3¼", 316 lbs. A dominant small school Tackle who projects to be a pretty good Guard prospect for the NFL. He really stood out at the Senior Bowl. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles admire the power, mobility and potential but note several areas where his technique needs help. Here is a New Year scouting profile.

4:16

OL/TACKLE Chuma Edoga, USC. 6'3½", 308 lbs. with really long 34⅞" arms (81⅛" wingspan), exceptional feet, and top notch athleticism overall. A standout pass protector at the Senior Bowl. The NFL.com scouting profile calls him "a smooth, athletic run-blocker and an uneven, unrefined pass protector" who needs to work on his core strength and anchor. The Draft Network scouting profiles agrees that a lack of core strength and a poor anchor are his overwhelming Achilles heel.

4:16

OL/GUARD/CENTER Michael Jordan, Ohio St. 6'5⅞", 307 lbs. with long 34¼" arms. A high ceiling prospect who possesses both the athleticism and frame to be even bigger, stronger, and more mobile than he was in college. The NFL.com scouting profile identifies Jordan's main weakness as simple reaction time that was less of an issue at Guard than Center. Thinking too much? The Draft Network scouting profiles page loves the tools but hates the footwork.

4:16

OL/GUARD Drew Samia, Oklahoma. 6'4¾", 305 lbs. A 4-year starter at Tackle who made up for his lack of size with exceptional athleticism. The Draft Network scouting profiles laud Samia as "One of the best pulling offensive linemen in the country [and] consistently explosive out of his stance." The NFL.com scouting profile notes that he was the OL leader of this very good group, and describes him as "a loose-limbed, athletic guard [with good] foot quickness and second-level agility [but] issues with core strength and body control at the point of attack."

4:16

TE Alize Mack, Notre Dame. {Visit} 6'4", 249 lbs. A catch-point monster and one of the best route running TE's in the draft, he's flashed quite often but has red flags for injury concerns and "team rule violations". Here is a good highlight by Brad Kelly and a New Year's follow up by the Draft Network staff. This goes to an excellent pre-Combine scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins. The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as a good but not brilliant Move TE prospect "who shies away from the physical requirements asked of him in the run game." But that isn't the whole story. Read this August 2017 article on how his suspension prompted some genuine soul searching and maturation, and then this recent March 2019 article on how increased maturity led to better blocking, are must-reads to get a fix on who this prospect is from an off-field POV. He tested out as a very good but not great athlete, so the blocking questions really come down to whether you believe he will try hard enough to get there. It is not an easy projection and the interviews will really matter.

4:16

TE Drew Sample, Washington. 6'4¾", 255 lbs. A classic, well rounded TE2 who made his college reputation as a run blocker but has the athleticism and skills to be a decent receiving weapon too. The NFL.com scouting report describes the sort of prospect who should enjoy a long journeyman career. The Draft Network scouting profiles basically agree: highish floor and lowish ceiling combine for a safe, useful, but uninspiring mid-round grade.

4:16

RB Rodney Anderson, Oklahoma. 6'⅜", 224 lbs. One of the most divisive "if only" prospects of the class because of extreme talent offset by constant injury. Anderson was often viewed as the #1 RB prospect going in to 2018 but then he had yet another season ending injury - three in four years for a redshirt Junior! - and his stock plummeted. The injuries were a broken leg in the 3rd game of 2015, a preseason neck vertebrae fracture in 2016, and a torn ACL in the 2nd game of 2018. None seem related and all looked flukey at the time, but that's a lot of smoke when you add it up. When healthy Anderson looks like a better version of James Conner with just as much power, more speed, better shiftiness, and better (in college) hands as a receiver. The blocking needs work but that almost goes without saying for a college RB. He This goes to a gif-supported scouting report from February. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

4:16

RB Damien Harris, Alabama. {Visit}. 5'10⅛", 216 lbs. A solid but not exciting back who is good in almost all facets of the game and better than good as a receiver. No one has anything bad to say except by way of faint praise. Harris lacks the sparkle needed to set him apart from the crowd. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

4:16

RB Darrell Henderson, Memphis. 5'8⅜", 208 lbs. Oh how the Combine can foul a narrative up! The NFL.com scouting profile and Draft Network scouting profiles unanimously agree on the film: Darrell Henderson's tape shows a catch-me-if-you-can king who'd be an ideal change of pace option for the Steelers. Lance Zierlein used words like, "home-run hitter doesn't begin to describe his explosive production" and "His movement has electric feel." But the testing showed average speed (4.49) with pedestrian pop (1.59 split and meh leaps). So what is the real story?

4:16

WR Keelan Doss, U.C. Davis. 6'2⅛", 211 lbs. An intriguing small school guy who's made a name for himself by being a contested catch monster. He has lots of room to improve as a route runner but has shown a wide route tree. Had a great week and game at the Senior Bowl where his route running skill stood out.

4:16

WR Terry Godwin, Georgia. 5'11", 185 lbs. A man among boys at the Shrine Game, Godwin is one of those slippery technicians with much more athleticism than people give him credit for. His stats are less than gaudy because he was the WR3 on a team stacked with talent at the position (Riley Ridley and Mecole Hardman were the top 2), but that may say more about them than it does about him. All sources agree that he needs, first and foremost, at least a year working in an NFL weight room. His short arms and small hands bother some people too. This goes to a gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report from February. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

4:16

WR Stanley Morgan, Nebraska. 6'0", 202 lbs. Morgan's 88th percentile SPARQ score opened a lot of eyes to a prospect who the NFL.com scouting profile had to defend as "more than just a guy." The film showed a classic possession receiver who'd fit as a WR4/5 type. Now the world is running back to see if there's more ceiling than people thought.

4:16

WR Hunter Renfrow, Clemson. 5'10⅜", 184 lbs. Doesn't have the size, speed, or quickness you look for but he has some of the best hands in the class even if they are child sized (7⅞" across). Renfrow also knows how to run routes and read coverages as well as any college WR, he never stops competing even on blocks, and he always comes through in the clutch. This is your guy if you believe in the things that can't be measured. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile. And about those hands... Forget "sticky"; this kid has made some catches that clearly required either psychic levitation powers or magic-laced, ball repelling shoelaces. C.L.U.T.C.H.

Steelers Pick at 4:20

5:01

DL Zach Allen, Boston College. 6'4⅜", 281 lbs. with 34¾" gorilla arms. You've got to love smart, football-loving, tough-guy grinders who stand up Offensive Tackles in the run game and beat them on passing downs with grit, persistence and an array of subtle but nasty hand fighting and leverage techniques. He also put up a shockingly good top-20% SPARQ score that answered a lot of the questions people had about his ceiling. Alas, but he's a pure, Day Two DE for a 4-3 team who'd be stuck between roles in Pittsburgh: too small for a DE and too stiff for an OLB. The grade would be even lower if there was no chance he could bulk up into a smaller Defensive Tackle. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile. Sad thought, but he sounds like a perfect Patriot even down to the Boston connection.

5:01

DL Isaiah Buggs, Alabama {Meeting at Senior Bowl}. 6'3⅛", 306 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles describe a refined technician who uses his hands well and has good, low pad level, but suffers from a reputation of taking plays off and possesses only moderate explosion in that key first step. Notably short (30⅞") arms won't help him at all against NFL linemen. Here is a gif-supported scouting report.

5:01

DL Kingsley Keke, Texas A&M. 6'2⅝", 288 lbs. with long (34½") arms. It's a question of fit. He's a fluid, athletic guy for his size but a bit short compared to the Heyward/Tuitt prototype, a bit light compared to Hargrave, and he lost some of his movement skills in prior years when he'd bulked up to the size Pittsburgh would need him to play at. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile. The Draft Network scouting profiles echo the questions about where he would fit on an NFL roster. This goes to a pre-Combine gif-supported scouting report.

5:01

DL Anthony Nelson, Iowa. 6'6⅞", 272 lbs. A good looking 4-3 anchor-type DE who will fit some other team a lot better than Pittsburgh, where he'd be asked to bulk up into a mobile Defensive Tackle rather than a Size XL Edge player. His biggest flaws are a lack of bend and ability to play in space, both of which make him unsuited to the 3-4 OLB role. This goes to a gif-supported pre-Combine scouting report.

5:01

DL/NT Olive Sagapolu, Wisconsin. 6'2", 345 lbs. A Day 3 immovable object.

5:01

DL/NT Armon Watts, Arkansas. 6'4⅝", 300 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles page and the NFL.com scouting profile add up to describe a technically advanced, country strong player who understands how to play with leverage. That means he is very hard to move backward even with double teams, and will often reset the line of scrimmage a yard into the backfield. But that is most of what he offers. Almost no pursuit or pass rush ability unless the QB gets chased into the pocket he just pushed. A good D-Lineman but only a two-down contributor. Watts was one of two players featured in Jon Ledyard's February article on mid-round DL sleepers, which also suggested a Round 4 grade.

5:01

EDGE Jamal Davis II, Akron. 6'3⅛", 243 lbs. A small school, SPARQ score star (top 20%) that was held back significantly by height and weight concerns compared to 4-3 DE's - issues that concern the 3-4 oriented Steelers less than his exceptional burst and bend. The NFL.com scouting profile is an interesting read: it notes an exceptional spin move in both directions, worries about his athleticism (no longer at issue), but most of all focuses on coachable issues like giving up his chest and poor hand usage. Interesting note: he is a former Pitt player and good friends with James Conner.

5:01

EDGE Darryl Johnson, North Carolina A&T. 6'6", 253 lbs. A very raw small-school wunderkind with the raw athletic ability to succeed in the NFL as a 3-4 OLB in the Steelers' system. Our own Nick Farabaugh calls him, "crazy bendy... [a guy who can] just slither around the edge [], run a tight arc and use his size and length [] with amazing ankle flexibility." The NFL.com scouting profile sort of agrees, but emphasizes that he really is incredibly raw, has very limited small-school experience, and suffers from serious lack of play strength. The same thing goes for the Draft Network scouting profiles: the bend is real but everything else screams "practice squad."

5:01

EDGE Shareef Miller, Penn St. 6'4½", 254 lbs. Possesses a flashy and explosive first step that he can combine with decent bend around the edge and some pop in his hands, but the testing confirmed a lack of grown man strength, his vertical leap was a worst-in-class warning to all, and his overall SPARQ score came in at the bottom 10% despite a good 40 time and his length. Those are awful numbers for a kid touted as winning on his athletic edge. See the NFL.com scouting profile for an example: "good size and athletic traits but a lack of functional skill at this point." If the traits are less than real he will be in trouble. The Draft Network scouting profiles page echoes the technical complaints and worries about his fundamental toughness.

5:01

EDGE Malik Reed, Nevada {Meeting at the NFLPA Bowl}. 6'1", 250 lbs. A badly undersized but absurdly productive 4-3 Defensive End in 2016 and 2017, Reed moved to OLB in 2018 as part of a unique 3-3-5 system. His stats went down but your humble author contends that it was still good training for the 3-4 OLB position he'll have to play in the NFL. No kidding here: Reed looks exactly like the pass rushers that Pittsburgh used to steal in the drafts of 20 years ago. You aren't going to stop him if he gets even an inch around the edge, which he does a lot. The main assets are an amazing ability to bend around the corner, a great get off that only makes it more lethal, and an obsessive work ethic to keep getting better. It's the lack of size & strength, raw hand usage, and new-to-the-position klutziness of 2018 that lower his stock. If a lineman locks him up, he stays locked up, and his film looks a lot less than good moving in space. Reed stopped being a sleeper after dominating the NFLPA Game but he's going to be the secret crush for a lot of fans who see the highlight film. This Lions-oriented scouting profile from February sees him as a pass rushing specialist who could grow into a full time star. Here is the Draft Network scouting profiles page.

5:01

MACK ILB Cody Barton, Utah. 6'2½", 237 lbs. Made it onto the Board with an excellent Combine that averaged out to a top-third SPARQ score based on a well balanced, movement-oriented athletic profile. The NFL.com scouting profile had made his range and ability to move in space the main question marks, and these results suggests he is physically capable. He particularly excelled in the C.O.D. drills, which the Draft Network scouting profiles had identified as a weakness even though he's called, "a great man coverage player." Being a 24 year old rookie will hurt a bit, however.

5:01

MACK ILB Gary Johnson, Texas {Visit}. 5'11⅞", 226 lbs. They say speed kills, but what if it only goes in a straight line? The NFL.com scouting profile lauds Gary Johnson's energy and leadership skills but questions his actual foot speed, range and athleticism. OTOH our own Nick Farabaugh has no doubt about Johnson's athletic skills, and instead believes he is a boom or bust candidate with a real NFL future if but only if he can learn NFL schemes and recognition skills. The spider chart on his Combine results may explain some of this: it ranges from a 97th percentile dash down to an 8th percentile shuttle! Speed, A+; COD, F-. Note that Johnson comes with a great story that testifies to his internal grit: he spent years in foster- and group homes, and has used football to claw his way up from as tough a situation as you can imagine.

5:01

MACK ILB Ty Summers, TCU. 6'1⅜", 241 lbs. A 90th percentile SPARQ score at the Combine but, as the NFL.com scouting profile explains, he is more of a special teams super stud who doubles at linebacker than vice versa. He is also a bit on the older side compared to Pittsburgh's normal preferences (will turn 24 as a rookie).

5:01

CB/FS Mike Jackson, Miami. 6'⅝", 210 lbs. An excellent but straight line athlete who is probably more of a Free Safety than a Corner, but only if his tackling improves. Grades vary from board to board to reflect whether the particular author believes his press-man skills will be good enough to survive the COD deficits. Have a look at the spider chart of his performance to see how a prospect in the 95th SPARQ score percentile can be said to have real athletic concerns. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. The NFL.com scouting profile leans toward seeing him as a future Free Safety, while the Draft Network scouting profiles page leans toward preserving the question marks. Either way he could be a good backup for Sean Davis.

5:01

FS/CB Ken Webster, Ole Miss. 5'10⅞", 203 lbs. A SPARQ score wunderkind (99th percentile), Webster blew up the Combine but emphatically failed to blow up the playing season. The NFL.com scouting profile grants his physicality and tackling, but has severe complaints about his coverage skill. But with that native athletic edge... perhaps he could be a free roving Safety or a tackling Nickel Corner? The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids.

5:01

CB Corey Ballentine, Washburn. 5'11⅜", 196 lbs. A small school phenom at Corner who also excelled in special teams as a gunner, kick blocker and a returner against his lower level of competition. He got torched at the Senior Bowl when he tried to step up against the college big boys for the first time, but his stock recovered some luster at the Combine when he put up a 96th NFL percentile SPARQ score and an athletic profile with no real holes. He is also reported to have high character with a nice, physical edge to his game. Lance Zierlein's NFL.com scouting report acknowledges the athleticism but worries about the development time. His age may matter to Pittsburgh (turns 24 as a rookie).

5:01

CB Mark Fields, Clemson. 5'9⅞", 192 lbs. The eponymous son of a former Round 1 linebacker and two-time pro bowler, Fields has lots of physical talent that includes 4.37 speed but injuries and inconsistent play let a Sophomore sensation take over his starting job. Never looked bad, just underwhelming when much more was expected. The NFL.com scouting profile points to a clunky backpedal and a variety of technical glitches as specific issues that will require at least one redshirt year to fix.

5:01

OL/GUARD Beau Benzschawel ("BEN-shawl"), Wisconsin. 6'6¼", 309 lbs. Tall but not exceptionally long, the NFL.com scouting profile describes him as a "tall, pass-blocking specialist who will need to prove he can be serviceable against NFL power in the run game." Zierlein also describes him as being technically accomplished with a high football IQ and the sort of multi-sport athlete Pittsburgh likes; just underpowered in a notable way. The Draft Network scouting profile describes a totally opposite player who is "Strong as hell [and a] very capable power player who will lock horns in tight spaces effectively [but is] rather rigid in his pass sets." This January scouting profile from our sister site for the Giants likes both his power and his pass sets, but not the way he moves in space. NOTE: the comments are worth more than the text and point to some balance issues. Had a fine Senior Bowl week.

5:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Bobby Evans, Oklahoma. 6'4⅜", 312 lbs. with long 34¾" arms. A 3-year starter at Tackle who gets special praise in both the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile for exceptional core strength to fight off bull rushes, mobility in space, and powerful hands when he lands them. His limits getting depth against really fast edge rushers limit the upside, and there are the usual array of technique problems endemic in college linemen.

5:01

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Max Scharping, N. Ill. 6'5⅞", 327 lbs. A Right Tackle prospect who could probably slide in to play Guard, Scharping earned a really good grade from Lance Zierlein (an OL coach's son) in the NFL.com scouting profile. Zierlein praised his "impressive combination of size and functional athletic ability" but reading between the lines suggests a thought that Scharping's array of technical flaws would be relatively easy to fix if he's as coachable as they say. The Draft Network scouting profiles hint at the same idea: "the process isn't as good as the results."

5:01

QB Daniel Jones, Duke. 6'5⅛", 221 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen. He might possibly fall to Round 2 but no further.

5:01

QB Drew Lock, Missouri. 6'3¾", 228 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen. Lock is a strong-armed QB who fits extremely well in a vertical passing game and has shown significant growth. Sure to be a Round 1 pick.

5:01

TE Kendall Blanton, Missouri {Meeting at the Shrine Game}. 6'6¼", 262 lbs. A size XL, box-out receiving threat who became a good blocker in 2018 but simply lacks the speed to be a threat down the seam. Projects as a multipurpose TE2 to compete with or replace Jesse James.

5:01

TE/WR Donald Parham, Stetson. 6'8⅜", 243 lbs. A massively oversized receiver and mismatch weapon, this January scouting profile describes a very raw prospect from a tiny school with great hands, potentially coachable issues across the line with route running, good but not great speed, and no future at all as an in-line blocker. That said, he did dominate his competition for his entire tenure at Stetson to the point where he received a Senior Bowl invite. Looks like a boom-or-bust prospect with extreme potential on both ends.

5:01

TE Caleb Wilson, UCLA. 6'4¼", 240 lbs. A receiving TE who was Josh Rosen's favorite weapon in 2017 before injuring a foot, and continued that success in 2018. But can he block? A terrible Senior Bowl week that highlighted "stiff and lethargic" route running, followed by a bad fumble in the game, have lowered his stock. Running a great 40 at the Combine stabilized it (4.56 with a class-best 10 yard split) but the other testing was distinctly average. The Combine coverage noted a history of drops.

5:01

RB RyQuell Armstead, Temple. 5'11¼", 220 lbs. A feisty and powerful RB who refuses to go down on first contact and who fleshed out his pass blocking and receiving in 2018. Agility and ball security were issues that appeared on tape, and sure enough the measurable athletic profile shows surprisingly good speed, surprisingly bad explosiveness, and sub-par agility. Our own CHISAP knew him as a boy and certifies that he is a hard working kid with a track background and top notch locker room characteristics. The NFL.com scouting profile ends in a pretty good ‘solid backup' grade but adds questions about his field vision and lack of receiving ability.

5:01

RB Myles Gaskin, Washington. 5'9¼", 205 lbs. A good, solid player who'd go higher if he was elite in any single way. Elusive but not a jitterbug; fast but not scary; tough but undersized; etc. He does get a straight "A" for receiving ability but his body would not hold up if asked to be the bell cow and he lacks the pure electricity to be an ideal change of pace guy. He could get stuck in ‘tweener land from a Steeler POV. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report. The Draft Network scouting profiles laud his vision and competitiveness, while the NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes his extreme productivity and multifaceted skill set, but all of them ex- or implicitly raise questions about the amount of tread that's left on his well used tires.

5:01

RB Bryce Love, Stanford. 5'8⅞", 200 lbs. Small but stout even though he's been unlucky on the injury front with ankles & etc, the most recent being a mild tear to his ACL from which he hopes to return in time for the Combine. His breakaway speed and elusiveness are all but elite and the contact balance a bit less so, but it's the health that plagues him. Bryce Love has shown all the abilities you want except those that start with dur- and avail-. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

5:01

RB Dexter Williams, Notre Dame. 5'11⅛", 212 lbs. Williams is a moderately divisive prospect. Just compare the Draft Network scouting profiles, which critique him as a good but limited system runner, and the NFL.com scouting profile, which describes him as an "ascending every-down running back prospect who showed major flashes of ... feel, force and juice, which allows for a variety of methods in creating yards for himself." Quite a difference. He had a Combine good enough to stand out in this very mediocre class, with an athletic profile full of C.O.D. and explosiveness numbers that led to a top 20% (4th in the class) SPARQ score. There are red flags for 2016 marijuana and firearm possession charges and an unspecified 2018 violation of Notre Dame's strict team rules policy, but he did stay on and get his degree.

5:01

RB James Williams, Wash. St. 5'9½", 197 lbs. A classic receiving weapon out of the backfield who possess wonderful hands, contact balance, and a solid combination of speed and quickness. A tough minded, hard driving player too who will be a fan favorite. But he really is on the lighter side, would get pounded to bits if asked to be a bell cow back, and can only hope to cut block if he has to pick up a blitzing linebacker. The Draft Network scouting profiles see a 4th Round talent very similar to the Patriots' James White. The NFL.com scouting profile description seems to match ("plays with oily hips and slippery feet") but ends with a Round 6-7 numerical grade.

5:01

WR Jamal Custis, Syracuse. 6'4⅛", 214 lbs. A one trick pony who is all about stretching the field with decent speed and then making the catch over everyone else with his height, hands and body control. That talent really stood out in the Shrine Game practices but his grade drops a bit nevertheless because he is quite raw and never put up a lot in the way of numbers. Here is a Draft Network scouting profile. This goes to a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from an avowed fan who nevertheless ends with a Round 4 grade based on the need to learn his craft. The NFL.com scouting profile calls him a "mismatch jump ball artist" but worries about his play strength and inconsistency.

5:01

WR Greg Dortch, Wake Forest. 5'7⅛", 173 lbs. Another prospect with the right to argue he's the best jitterbug slot WR in the draft. He's not just lightning quick and a sharp route runner, but also physical enough to out muscle similarly sized Corners. The big worry with Dortch, like his peers, is simple durability.

5:01

WR Penny Hart, Georgia St. 5'8", 180 lbs. As near as I could tell not a single Corner managed to Penny Hart in any rep at any Senior Bowl practice. He looked like Barry Sanders toying with defensive linemen. So why isn't he any higher? Because the size differential looked a lot similar too. Bottom line: Penny Hart will make plays in the NFL (lots of plays) as both a receiver and a returner but only if (i) he has a QB accurate enough to hit his miniature catch radius, and (ii) he can survive the pounding. The first is uncommon to say the least. The second is unknown and history, with exceptions, is against him. Here is the Draft Network scouting profile. This gif-supported, Steelers-oriented scouting report from February ends with a Round 6 grade based in large part on the size limitations.

5:01

WR Kelvin McKnight, Samford. 5'8", 185 lbs. One of the deadliest receivers in the class despite his lack of inches, McKnight's ability to win off press and run great routes will make him a popular target. One of the rare small guys who can play both in the slot and outside. This goes to a written interview he did with our own Nick Farabaugh.

5:01

WR Dillon Mitchell, Oregon. {Visit}. 6'1¼", 197 lbs. A solid all-around receiver damned by the lack of anything particularly special in his game. He is fast and explosive but not amazingly so; he's got excellent hands but not great ones; Size L but not XL; and according to the Draft Network scouting profiles he tracks the ball poorly enough to turn some easy catches into hard ones. On the plus side he's show the ability to run very sharp routes despite a limited tree, which was enough to give top CB prospect Byron Murphy fits in the Washington game. The NFL.com scouting profile likes the physical talent but slams him for a perceived lack of focus, dedication and work ethic in the weight room. Interviews will matter a lot.

Steelers Pick at 5:03

5:16

EDGE Mathieu Betts, Laval. 6'3". 244 lbs. Let the battle begin! Our own Nick Farabaugh is a fan who sees this Canadian prospect as a truly superior Edge prospect. "I think he has it all in terms of an explosive first step and bend around the edge, though some high pad level does temper the excitement." The well respected and Pittsburgh based Jon Ledyard would beg to differ: "Not explosive and won't threaten the edge with his first step or the speed thereafter. Appears athletically lacking in this area... Stiff in the hips and doesn't show the bend to work through contact... Unbelievable motor [that] chases down every single play and rarely hesitates for a second from snap-to-whistle." What thinks the rest of BTSC? He looked okay but not special at the Shrine Game.

5:16

EDGE Markus Jones, Angelo State. 6'3", 255 lbs. A small school standout who flashes good straight line burst, pad level, hand usage, and the ability to win inside. The bend isn't all that striking and the speed-to-power aspect needs work, but Jones made a real name for himself at the Shrine Game against superior college talent.

5:16

EDGE Oshane Ximines, Old Dominion. 6'3½", 253 lbs. This year's small school phenom features tremendous hand work and general athleticism but hasn't shown the extraordinary bend of an elite pass rusher. The process will tell us a lot more about his ability to step up to NFL caliber competition. This gif-supported scouting report sees him as an undersized 4-3 DE with real potential but a desperate need for both coaching and at least one redshirt year before seeing any defensive snaps. The Draft Network scouting profiles seem to agree with that take. The NFL.com scouting profile is also positive and also viewed him as a 4-3 DE who might be on the "3-4 teams [] radar depending on his athletic testing." Well, the testing came back at "not so much" with a 34th percentile SPARQ score and klutzy looking field drills.

5:16

MACK ILB Dakota Allen, Texas Tech. 6'¾", 232 lbs. Good game (but not timed) speed and coverage ability, combined with a good work ethic and big time willingness to hit. Recognition and wading through traffic could use some work. He just doesn't seem to have that knack for seeing the entire field and how plays are developing. There used to be a red flag for getting dismissed on burglary charges but it has flipped to his favor. The charges were dismissed, Tech took him back, he was elected twice as a team captain, and he is known for his leadership. The NFL.com scouting profile raises questions about his athleticism and instincts; questions also raised by poor testing in all but the COD drills, where he excelled.

5:16

BUCK ILB Tre Watson, Maryland. 6'2", 236 lbs. A former JUCO product who possesses a superior ability to sift through the trash and scrape over the top to make plays, but who lacks first step quickness, overall range, and has only an average amount of native athleticism. He has flashed good ball skills, which accounted for 5 interceptions in 2018. A Buck ILB with good ball skills? A step-slow Mack? You decide. Here is the Draft Network scouting profiles page.

5:16

FS Ugochukwu Amadi, Oregon {Visit}. 5'9⅜", 199 lbs. He's got great leadership skills and some decent coverage ability, but the athleticism falls in the bottom 15% from a SPARQ perspective and only some okay (4.51) speed and long arms made it that high. The NFL.com scouting profile sees him as more of a special teams player with Safety upside, but one who's likely to find a home in the right situation because of all the intangibles.

5:16

SS Mike Bell, Fresno St. 6'2¾", 210 lbs. Long even for someone of that height, with no particular flaws except those going into the world's worst SPARQ score (bottom 0.2% - ouch), which he did improve at his pro day to a good extent (like a very moderate 4.65 dash in place of a world-ending 4.83). This goes to The Draft Network scouting profiles page. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile, which saw nothing like those athletic limitations and ends on a pretty solid grade. This goes to a pro day video interview.

5:16

SS/FS Marvell Tell III, USC. 6'2", 195 lbs. All the physical talent you want and more. He did not do enough tests at the Combine to earn a full SPARQ score but it would clearly be in the top 1-2% because every test he did scored well into a single digit percentile. The athleticism is absurd. But the downside is this: the tape says he may just be the Justin Gilbert of Safeties. The Draft Network scouting profiles page complains of terrible angles, poor tackling when he arrives, and serious questions about his level of effort. The NFL.com scouting profile starts with some criticism of his football IQ, but then follows suit to discuss perceived lack of overall toughness in his game and maybe personality: "Always the nail and never the hammer". Interviews will make all the difference.

5:16

CB Jimmy Moreland, James Madison. 5'11", 174 lbs. A member of the chirp squad, Moreland is one of those dynamo slot CBs who will go on Day 3 to a team that falls in love. Size and level of competition are the only flaws you'll read about. Quickness, tackling, ball skills, attitude... Those he nails. Here is a long, gif-supported scouting report/sales pitch from the Draft Network.

5:16

CB/FS Jamal Peters, Miss. St. 6'1¾", 218 lbs. Peters has the length and athleticism you want in a CB but lacks the technical understanding to fully capitalize on it. Being much rawer than Artie Burns was, and a 4.63 dash at the Combine (ouch), should keep his stock in the lower rounds. The question marks and potential are discussed in this BTSC article on this year's CB/S hybrids. The NFL.com scouting profile argues that he has solid developmental potential despite the low floor, including the physicality to move to Safety if he has to.

5:16

CB Kendall Sheffield, Ohio St. 5'11⅜", 193 lbs. He's got speed to burn (4.2-something?) and athleticism to match, but even the Ohio State coaches could get him anything close to consistent. Some of his bad games were epic. Franchise talent; major chance of a bust. Translating the NFL.com scouting profile: the speed, fluidity, and twitchy reactions promise the world, but he's never delivered and has shown problems both in finding and making a play on the football after it is in the air. The Draft Network scouting profile complains about competitive toughness as well as the missing ball skills. This late March article describes him as a "massive faller" in the draft and a "traits only" prospect. Here is a gif-heavy scouting report from mid-March.

5:16

OL/CENTER/GUARD Lamont Gaillard, Georgia. 6'2⅝", 305 lbs. with big, powerful 10⅜" hands. A favorite sleeper for son-of-an-OL-coach Lance Zierlein, whose NFL.com scouting profile describes Gaillard as a "three-year starter and team captain whose tenacity and dirt-dog mentality typifies the Georgia offensive line... Tougher than old brisket." Not an ideal fit for Pittsburgh from the neck down, but top notch heading upward. A lot of his flaws are coachable and cleaning them up could reveal a much better mover in space.

5:16

OL/GUARD Mitch Hyatt, Clemson. 6'5⅜", 303 lbs. with long 34⅛" arms and big 10¼" hands. A slightly undersized but great athlete who needs a serious year of work with an NFL strength coach, and another with a good enough coach to help him fix some significant technical flaws. Played Tackle in college but that is anyone's guess for the NFL. The NFL.com scouting profile sees him as a smart, locker room leader with a chance to be a zone-scheme Guard with backup Tackle flexibility - if the aforementioned conditioning takes hold. The Draft Network scouting profiles agree, assigning a solid if Day 3 grade. He tested out with a very respectable athletic profile heavy on the length and maneuverability side.

5:16

QB Brett Rypien, Boise St. 6'1⅝", 210 lbs. Mark Rypien's nephew is a bit on the small side and can be pressured, but overall he's smart, accurate, has a good arm, is very mobile, seems to have good above-the-neck qualities, and proved to be the alpha dog of the Shrine Game. A decent option if one of the young Steeler QB's gets hit by a meteor and the team gets the chance to bargain shop on someone who could easily go in Round 2. Otherwise [discount applied].

5:16

QB Easton Stick, North Dakota St. 6'1¼", 220 lbs. A raw but athletic QB prospect with some of the best tools in the draft (top 6% SPARQ score), he fits right into the Carson Wentz mold but is much rawer coming out of school. The processing issues offset his arm talent and other assets. Downgraded because the Steelers already have two young QBs they are developing.

5:16

TE Kaden Smith, Stanford. 6'5", 255 lbs. A good all-around TE prospect with various smaller holes and no particular physical genius to hang his hat on (bottom 8th percentile SPARQ score buoyed by nothing but a decent 3-cone drill). Known as someone who struggles to separate but gets results because he wins the inevitable combat catches and never drops a thing. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profiles, which collectively argue that he has promise but needs to improve in all of his fundamentals. This pre-Combine, gif-supported scouting report liked his hands and body control enough to give a fringe-3rd grade.

5:16

RB Alex Barnes, Kansas St. 6'⅜", 226 lbs. Got on the Board after a stand out Combine that put him well into the top 10% of SPARQ scores (top 1% according to this site)based on an impressive athletic profile that favors explosiveness and C.O.D. skills despite his size. And a record breaking bench press of course. Who is this guy? The NFL.com scouting profile may be most impressive because it gives a solid grade after knocking him for "lack of downhill burst" - the very thing he tests best a - and praises subtler things like good hands and vision. This brief February scouting profile describes a good but linear athlete; again, at sharp odds with the testing. Barnes appears to be a personal draft crush for the well respected Matt Waldman, who uses words like "potentially dominant" and offers an in-passing player comp to David Johnson. He gets mention as a big winner in this post-Combine BTSC article on the RB class, which adds a comparison to Nick Chubb.

5:16

RB Karan Higdon, Michigan. 5'9½", 206 lbs. A good, patient runner who hits the hole hard and does every part of his job in a solid but not dynamic way. The combination of Higdon's limited size and devoted physicality also raises some questions about his long term durability and his ability to pass block. There are no obvious reasons to question his hands but he was rarely used as an outlet receiver even though Michigan could have used one. Described in November as a genuine boost to a modest RB class, the Draft Network scouting profiles page and the NFL.com scouting profile both describe a tough, no-nonsense back who will take what's given using a variety of tools, but probably won't find any more than that on his own. Here is a brief, Raiders-oriented scouting profile from January.

5:16

RB Wes Hills, Slippery Rock. 6'½", 215 lbs. Hills is a BTSC darling that our own CHISAP knew as a High Schooler and describes as, "a true NFL-caliber athlete [and] a great kid who overcame a lot of hardship to get to where he is." A small school hero who played just north of the Burgh, Hills was all but impossible for D-II tacklers to handle. Fantastic contact balance, great vision, good speed, and a sophisticated ability to use his blockers are the high points. The questions go to his overall agility and athleticism, unknown skills as a receiver, and blocking that is... Let's be nice and call it "D-II". He was the offensive MVP of the NFLPA game and followed up with a fine week at the Senior Bowl. Here is a January scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins.

5:16

RB Elijah Holyfield, Georgia. 5'10⅜", 217 lbs. Evander's son shares his famous work ethic and overachieves in a similar way. Yes, his bottom 5% SPARQ score was an embarrassment for a position where those measurements tend to translate; and yes, the score would have been worse but for bench press numbers and size; but we knew some of that in advance. Holyfield has always earned most of his praise for excelling in all the subtle ways like being super quick over a vital few inches rather than feet, superior contact balance, leadership, toughness, vision and determination. The Draft Network scouting profiles add questions about his receiving ability but do not doubt his ability to make a team. The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as a "ball of fury wrapped in a muscular packaging" and compares him to Mark Ingram. This thorough, gif-heavy February scouting report from our sister site for the Jets ends with a Round 3 to 4 grade, and is particularly recommended for a heavy dose of background. This less thorough but still gif-supported February scouting report sees more of a Round 4-6 talent. This Bears-oriented February scouting profile compares him to Jordan Howard. He gets mention as a big loser in this post-Combine BTSC article on the RB class.

5:16

RB Travis Homer, Miami {Visit}. 5'10⅜", 201 lbs. Plays bigger than he is but can he hold up? A good, sound all around back with excellent athleticism that yielded a top 20% SPARQ score based primarily on speed and explosion. Sure enough, according to the NFL.com scouting profile his tape shows an outside runner who performs best when he can slash through a hole, use his speed, and then finish with a display of his good competitive fire. He actually likes to block in pass pro and shined as a special teams gunner. Sounds great, but he has two real question marks: ball security and poor field vision. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from January. This goes to a nice March scouting profile from our sister site for the Redskins.

5:16

RB Devine Ozigbo, Nebraska. 5'11⅞", 233 lbs. A prospect in the exact mold of Lev Bell and James Conner, minus that final step to pull away for stat-filling extra yards. Could he do what they did and lose 10-15 pounds in order to gain it? The NFL.com scouting profile describes him as an "intriguing, one-year wonder with size and speed... an explosive, downhill [but one-speed] runner with adequate vision and above-average power," but cautions that a lot of his production came from beating up on the lesser teams he faced. Probably fits best as a change of pace for teams with an established speed back as the #1, but of course that isn't how you'd describe the Steelers. The Draft Network scouting profiles page likes his lateral movement, especially for such a big man, and notes the vision and patience it took to excel in Nebraska's zone running scheme. Here is a Christmas scouting profile. This admirably thorough February scouting profile ends with a Round 3 grade and a ‘recommended read' star. Here is a February interview with our sister site for the Titans. This February EaglesWire scouting profile also earns a ‘recommended read', and particularly praises his determination and patient running style. Ozigbo was a Combine snub but had an excellent pro day to reinforce his stock.

5:16

RB L.J. Scott, Michigan St. 6'⅜", 227 lbs. Another prospect in the Bell/Conner mold who runs hard and catches well but lacks top end speed and might benefit from dropping into super-lean mode. Has a long issue of getting hampered by nagging injuries too. The Draft Network scouting profiles page knocks his vision but still sees him as a valuable backup. The NFL.com scouting profile notes good receiving ability and offers a bad OL as the explanation for somewhat limited production numbers. This goes to a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from February that ends with a Round 5-6 grade.

5:16

RB Devin Singletary, Florida Atl. 5'7½", 203 lbs. Unbelievable production that needs to be discounted for irregular competition and the inflation of a spread offense, though he's played very well against the better competition too. Very elusive with great jump cuts, patience, and contact balance. Nick Farabaugh's gif-supported BTSC scouting report describes him as an ultimate jitterbug held back from being a new Barry Sanders by his moderate breakaway speed - the highlight reel is a joy to watch. The Draft Network scouting profiles are similar but less effusive, and so was Lance Zierlein's NFL.com scouting profile until the Combine results through a monkey wrench into the proverbial works. The dot-sized spider chart says it all, but in words he measured super-short and put up a 20th percentile SPARQ score with especially bad marks in the C.O.D. skills where he was supposed to excel. He gets mention as a big loser in this post-Combine BTSC article on the RB class.

5:16

RB Mike Weber, Ohio St. {Visit}. 5'9⅝", 211 lbs. A well rounded back with quickness, power, receiving ability and vision. Injuries ruined 2017 but he bounced back well in 2018. The NFL.com scouting profile is full of faint praise leading to a backup grade; e.g., "Adequately skilled runner with decent size who can get what is blocked but is unlikely to find his own yards..." The Draft Network scouting profiles are a bit more positive but still suggest a Day 3 prospect.

5:16

RB Trayveon Williams, Texas A&M. 5'8⅛", 206 lbs. A solid receiving back who displays great intangibles and occasional big play burst, but lacks the vision and oomph to be more than a backup. This goes to a good, gif-supported scouting report that identifies lack of open field vision and creativity as his limitations, and ends with a verdict that he would make a good RB2 and an excellent RB3. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile, which raves about his football character and leadership skills, and the Draft Network scouting profiles, which collectively praise his contact balance as a major asset. A poor Combine (bottom 20% SPARQ score) highlighted an athletic profile with solid speed and explosion but terrible C.O.D. skills.

5:16

WR Tyre Brady, Marshall. 6'2¼", 206 lbs. with the wingspan of a condor. Brady has all the tools you could ask for: height, weight, speed, hands, movement and body control are all better than good. His stock dips because he has putrid blocking skills, no sophistication as a route runner, faced questionable competition, will be a 25 year old rookie, and had three "team rules" suspensions back in 2015 before he left Miami. No limit to either the upside or the floor. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from February. The NFL.com scouting profile views him as a decent developmental bet who desperately needs a year or two of good coaching, and whose prospects will depend entirely on his ability to absorb it.

5:16

WR Travis Fulgham, Old Dominion. 6'2⅜", 210 lbs. with exceptional 34¾" arms. The January scouting profile describes Fulgham as a true Juju-type receiver who wins with size, strength and body control, combined with sneaky speed. The flaws are lack of anything like polish, low level competition, and enough concentration drops to be a worry despite some circus catches to show the ceiling. The special asset? He blocks like Juju too.

5:16

WR Alexander Hollins, Eastern Illinois. 6'1", 196 lbs. Height, weight and especially speed makes him tempting as a pure deep threat.

5:16

WR Keesean Johnson, Fresno St. 6'1⅛", 201 lbs. A sleeper with absolutely brilliant hands, a fairly polished skill set, and excellent size. The NFL.com scouting profile grades him quite well. Alas, all the question marks went to his native athleticism and speed, and he utterly bombed all of that at the Combine with a pitiful bottom 10% SPARQ score and a total lack of redeeming athletic qualities. Here is a November scouting profile. He and Terry Godwin were dominant at the Shrine Game.

5:16

WR Tyler Johnson, Minnesota. 6'2", 200 lbs. A sleeper, Johnson is a well-rounded receiver who's great on contested catches and a YAC monster, but inconsistencies in route running and questions about his hands could hurt his value.

6:01

DL Greg Gaines, Washington. 6'1⅛", 307 lbs. A short, stocky and strong player who understands leverage and is therefore hard to move, but he offers no real pass rush ability.

6:01

DL/EDGE Joe Jackson, Miami. 6'4¼", 275 lbs. Big, strong, athletic, explosive and driven by a relentless, tenacious motor, but far from polished and not particularly bendy. Nature has designed him to be a 4-3 DE but he is included here because he is long and strong enough to have some vague potential as a penetrating DL in Pittsburgh's hybrid system. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

6:01

DL Daniel Wise, Kansas. 6'2⅝", 281 lbs. A pure penetrator with good 1st-step explosion but questionable ability to hold up if that trick fails. A standout at the Shrine Game where he regularly beat up on Centers and Guards alike.

6:01

EDGE Austin Bryant, Clemson. 6'3⅞", 271 lbs. He'd get a much higher grade on a 4-3 team looking for a solid, reliable DE who could push for playing time. Not a fit for Pittsburgh.

6:01

EDGE Wyatt Ray, Boston College. 6'3¼", 257 lbs. with short (32½") arms. A decent but not great athlete who plays with good pad level and a good motor, but suffers from a distinct lack of bend and counters. He has a pretty good bull rush but when that fails there are few tools left to call on. He also looked downright poor in the Combine field drills so falling back in coverage isn't likely to be his game either. Run support is solid but not good. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile.

6:01

MACK ILB/SS B.J. Blunt, McNeese State {Meeting at the Shrine Game}. 6'1", 220 lbs. Sometimes an article just nails it: "Blunt was such a delight to watch this [Shrine Game] week. Everything he does in practice and the game is at full-speed and exploding with energy. While he is undersized for the linebacker position and a transition to safety is inevitable, there is no denying his nose for the football... He may be from the small-school ranks and have tweener traits, but I am not betting against Blunt finding a role in sub-packages in the NFL while also being a dominant special teams performer. He has an infectious personality and love for the game that was obvious."

6:01

BUCK ILB Te'Von Coney, Notre Dame. 6'⅞", 244 lbs. A classic tackling machine whose athleticism and foot speed will limit him in the pros; think Vince Williams and Tyler Matakevich. Discount applied for lack of fit. Here is a Steelers-oriented, gif-supported scouting report from January that is as positive as any you'll find. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles agree that he is a pure 2-down thumper.

6:01

BUCK ILB Deshaun Davis, Auburn. 5'11⅜", 234 lbs. A fine football IQ with top notch tackling skills and a nonstop motor, but a fairly poor athlete who can get beaten by better ones. Would rank higher if that description did not fit Matakevich just as well or better. The NFL.com scouting profile is typical.

6:01

BUCK ILB TJ Edwards, Wisconsin. 6'⅜", 230 lbs. A fine run stuffer with a high football IQ but limited athleticism. Williams, Matakevich and Bostic require a major downgrade from a Steelers POV. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profiles and this to a February gif-supported and Steelers-oriented scouting report.

6:01

BUCK ILB Joe Giles-Harris, Duke. 6'1¾", 234 lbs. A good, solid linebacker with enough tools and football IQ to handle the college job but questions about whether it will be enough for the NFL: the sort of prospect who gets described as a much better football player than athlete. His Combine SPARQ score was pitiful. He was discussed in Nick Farabaugh's February BTSC pre-Combine article on favorite ILB prospects, and also listed in this pre-Combine article on "prospects who deserve more buzz". The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles agree that his future in the league would be limited to a 2-down thumper role.

6:01

BUCK ILB Kendall Joseph, Clemson. 5'11½", 233 lbs. A smart, quick reacting field general who lacks the pure physical genius to excel at the next level. Contribute? Absolutely. But that seems to be his ceiling. It does not help that he will turn 24 during his rookie year. The NFL.com scouting profile expresses severe reservations about his athleticism.

6:01

BUCK ILB Tre Lamar, Clemson. 6'3⅜", 253 lbs. He'd rank a lot higher if Vince Williams and Tyler Matakevich didn't play his role so well.

6:01

BUCK ILB Sione "Taki" Takitaki, BYU. 6'1⅛", 238 lbs. An explosive athlete with poor C.O.D. skills who plays with his hair on fire. A natural special teams demon. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

6:01

FS Lukas Denis, Boston Coll. 5'11", 185 lbs. A ballhawking center fielder with good range but a reputation of being a bit gun shy when it comes to delivering the lumber and issues wrapping up on tackles. Those problems showed up in spades at the Shrine Game.

6:01

SS/FS Malik Gant, Marshall. 5'11⅝", 206 lbs. A walk-on whose versatility earned starting snaps right away. Gant's length allows him to cover oversized slot receivers and TE's; he has the toughness to play downhill as a box guy; and he's shown the processing skills to play center field and zone. Gant is one of those guys who's just around the ball. The big knocks on him, other than raw skills and level of competition, are his slender frame and some highly questionable athletic testing (bottom 6% SPARQ score). The Year 2 player will be a lot bigger and tougher than anything he will show as a rookie. Here is a February scouting profile from Jon Ledyard.

6:01

FS/CB Montre Hartage, Northwestern. 5'11⅜", 190 lbs. Actually has some decent technique, with good physicality and tackling skills. Looked good at the Shrine Game but tested poorly and slow(4.68) at the Combine. The coverage crew to suggest he might do better as a Safety. The NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes his instincts and ball skills, calling him a true football player despite the limitations.

6:01

CB/FS Iman Lewis-Marshall, USC. 6'⅝", 207 lbs. but with very short (30⅝") arms. Another prospect who straddles the line between being a cover-capable Safety who lacks the instant COD and recovery speed to play Corner, and being a Safety who needs to work on his tackling skills. Another one who profiles similarly to Sean Davis in a lot of ways. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile. This goes to a very fun 2017 article on how he is now a 7-position player. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from just before the Combine.

6:01

CB Jordan Brown, S. Dakota St. 6'¾", 199 lbs. Team captain; ballhawk; multiyear starter; obvious size; and supposed to have good speed. The elephants in the room are the low level of competition and only managing to belong with the pack at the Senior Bowl The NFL.com scouting profile makes for an interesting read, concluding that Brown has real potential if he can maximize his "late bloomer" physical gifts with NFL coaching.

6:01

OL/TACKLE David Edwards, Wisconsin. 6'6¼", 308 lbs. As explained in the NFL.com scouting profile Edwards is a QB turned TE turned OL with good feet but a need to work on his strength and technique. The Draft Network scouting profile likes the strength and athleticism but also sees the need for a lot of development. Bottom 10% SPARQ results tend to support the athletic questions.

6:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Tytus Howard, Alabama St. 6'5", 322 lbs. A favorite sleeper of OL junkies around the Draftverse, Howard is a multisport athlete from a very small program who outgrew his QB and TE roots (by a lot!) and has evolved into a solid if developmental OL-prospect for the NFL. The NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes a fine showing against Auburn (to answer LOC questions) and opines that he is an athletic player with coachable problems (mostly false steps). This to-the-point February scouting profile follows identical reasoning, as does this Cardinals oriented scouting profile from January. The Draft Network scouting profiles page agrees that he has the tools but not the technical grounding. This solid-looking March scouting profile notes his impressive Senior Bowl week, highlighted by constant improvement, and ends with an "easy Day 2" grade. His extremely poor Combine will require some double checking but is belied by the film. A fine Day 3 flier.

6:01

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Isaiah Prince, Ohio St. 6'6½", 305 lbs. with gibbonesque 35½" arms. Both the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles describe him as a true boom or bust prospect who offers all the NFL potential you could want offset by serious waist-bending and footwork issues that could make success impossible.

6:01

QB Gardner Minshew, Wash. St. 6'⅞", 225 lbs. Think Cody Kessler or Matt Barkley; the sort of player with a decent floor but a ceiling somewhere around the Top 30-50 quarterbacks on the planet. The big assets: all the stuff you could ever want above the neck (both IQ and leadership), plus good accuracy and nice mobility. The red flag: mechanics so bad that someone will have to take his entire stance and throwing motion apart before trying to put it back together. That's just not easy to do and Pittsburgh's backup slots are pretty well filled.

6:01

TE Ravian Pierce, Syracuse. 6'3", 244 lbs. Good but not great in almost every way except the overall athleticism (superior) and the size (not so much), he was miscast as a blocker in the Syracuse system and that makes for a hard projection.

6:01

TE Tommy Sweeney, Boston Coll. 6'4½", 251 lbs. A rare, well rounded TE with a complete game. Would rank much higher if he'd shown the physical genius to be more than a solid contributor. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles page and a complimentary gif-supported scouting report from February.

6:01

RB Matt Colburn II, Wake Forest. 5'10", 200 lbs. A slippery runner who seems to be good but not special in almost all areas other than size and blocking ability. Level of competition has to be the biggest knock by far. This brief December scouting profile particularly noted his "stop and start on a dime" ability, which "lends itself to his vision and his ability to hit the smallest glimpse of daylight". The even briefer summary in this December bowl game preview calls him a Day 3 prospect who is "one of the twitchiest backs in the class".

6:01

RB Ty Johnson, Maryland. 5'10", 212 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profile notes his kick return ability and big play stats, while the NFL.com scouting profile seems to focus on his lack of size and playing strength, but the biggest issue for everyone is lack of snaps. Johnson lost his role to a redshirt freshman sensation named Anthony McFarland Jr. That's deprived him of the chance to prove what he needed to for the NFL draft. Ran amazingly fast at his pro day with reports varying from an astonishing 4.26 to a merely amazing 4.35.

6:01

RB/Offensive Weapon Tony Pollard, Memphis. 5'11⅝", 208 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profile describes him as "Mr. Versatility," and both the NFL.com scouting profile and this gif-supported scouting report would agree. He is a kick return expert and gadget guy who lacks the position-specific skills needed to excel ate either RB or WR. The Steelers don't have a Mr. Gadget on the roster but would Pollard be that guy? His hands have been inconsistent, with many bad drops balanced by true circus catches, and the level of competition makes his elusiveness harder to judge. He put up surprisingly average numbers at the Combine, though the overall SPARQ score may be artificially depressed by missing numbers for the C.O.D. drills where he should have excelled. Here is a local Pre-Combine February article for a bit more background, and a local early February article on his fine Senior Bowl week. Here is a brief Raiders-oriented scouting profile from December.

6:01

RB Benny Snell, Kentucky. 5'10⅜", 224 lbs. Very average Combine results confirmed the verdict of the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile: Snell is a charismatic, decent-floor, low-ceiling, try-hard hammer who will turn no yards into one and three yards into five, but won't break any run into 20. Top notch locker room character keeps his grade from dropping even further.

6:01

RB Darwin Thompson, Utah State. 5'8", 200 lbs. Grade dropped to reflect lack of need. A prospect who can legitimately dream of becoming the next Tarik Cohen or Dion Lewis. Ben Solak's part of the Draft Network scouting profiles compares him to Tyler Ervin. Short, yes, but he is also stout, strong and has some of the best contact balance in the class. Add in his proven receiving ability and Thompson could end up as a fantastic change of pace back if he can stand the rigors of the NFL game. The question marks go to poor vision, lack of the size to help in pass pro, and poor decision making.

6:01

WR Diontae Johnson, Toledo. 5'10", 193 lbs. A small school star who looked like someone with skills the NFL.com scouting profile likened to Manny Sanders, but all his success came against small school opponents. Tested beside the big boys the Combine, not so much. His SPARQ score came in around the bottom quarter of the league with awful agility marks in particular, an area that was supposed to be his special strength as a punt and kick returner.

6:01

WR Olabisi "Bisi" Johnson, Colorado St. 6'½", 204 lbs. Genuine NFL athleticism (top 15% SPARQ score) and, according to the NFL.com scouting profile, decent production are enough to make him a nice, solid sleeper for Day 3.

6:01

WR Jakobi Meyers, N.C. State. 6'1¾", 196 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles describe a converted QB who should be able to carve out a WR3/4 career but has the upside to be a bit more. He brings a versatile and useful skillset to the table that centers around being big, tough, wily and having good hands to win contested catches. He just isn't special in any key area. The NFL.com scouting profile is a bit less optimistic, ending with more of a WR4/5 grade.

6:01

WR David Sills V, W. Va. 6'3¼", 211 lbs. Sills offers nice size, good physicality, top 33% athleticism, and some signs that he understands how to run routes and how a WR fits into an overall offense. The main issue is an unfortunate and severe case of the dropsies on easy passes (his hands are actually better when he has to fight for the ball). These links go to the Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile. Here is a gif-supported scouting report from February. Part 2 of Geoffrey Benedict's Big WR series examines his film in more detail.

6:01

WR Jaylen Smith, Louisville. 6'2¼", 219 lbs. Sometimes he looks brilliant and fluid, and then a few plays later he looks klutzy and out of sync. The NFL.com scouting profile suggests that he may have mailed it in for 2018 when the loss of Lamar Jackson truly sank in. All agree Smith can be a major weapon once he has the ball, but he will also require at least a year of work before he learns how to get open enough to earn a target (let alone a catch) a pass in the NFL. This goes to a very lukewarm January scouting profile.

6:01

WR Cody Thompson, Toledo. 6'2", 206 lbs. The sort of player who is a bit hard to judge because he seemed to suffer throughout 2018 with the lingering effects of a 2017 broken leg and the loss of his close-to-pro QB Logan Woodside (now starting in the AAF). On the plus side, this January scouting profile makes it clear that he will indeed get open even in the NFL because of excellent height, speed, body control and especially route running. The NFL.com scouting profile particularly praises his soft hands, work ethic and study habits. His top 25% SPARQ score raised a lot of eyebrows because he hasn't played up to that level, but the heavy distribution toward C.O.D. skills may explain some of that. Quicker than fast as the saying goes.

6:01

WR Alex Wesley, Northern Colorado. 5'11⅞", 190 lbs. An electric, small school player who has grown as a route runner and become one of the better deep threats in the class. The grade would be even higher if his success had come against a higher level of competition. This goes to a January interview with our sister site for the Titans. This Broncos-oriented scouting profile emphasizes his pure track speed. The athletic profile confirmed the straight line speed and explosiveness but the C.O.D. drills came back at something close to an F-.

Steelers Pick at 6:02

6:16

DL/NT Edwin Alexander, LSU. 6'3", 339 lbs. A massive, fairly explosive NT who fills up space but greatly needs to work on his pad level.

6:16

DL/NT Khairi Clark, Florida. 6'1", 315 lbs. Rawer than raw with little to no explosive ability off the line. His ability to bull rush may earn a roster spot somewhere but he has massive work to do if he ever wants to be more than a gap plugging run stuffer.

6:16

DL/NT Renell Wren, Arizona St. 6'4⅞", 318 lbs. A "toolsy" prospect loaded with explosiveness, strength, and power that could let him play anywhere from the Nose to a 3-tech. But his technique is outright bad, he got dominated at the Senior Bowl practices, and rumor has it that questions arose about his coachability and other fuzzy matters. Expect him to fall much lower than he would in other years because of this class's incredible depth at the position. Here is a 3-reviewer January scouting profile.

6:16

EDGE Jesse Aniebonam, Maryland. 6'3", 260 lbs. Looked like a quick, explosive, and strong 4-3 DE prospect in 2016, but a serious ankle fracture ruined 2017 from the first game on and he did not look like his old self in 2018. Also tends to plays with a high pad level. Not a good fit.

6:16

EDGE Jalen Jelks, Oregon. 6'5⅜", 256 lbs. The film shows a very good first step but problems putting it all together at the same time. The Combine performance certainly didn't help his prospects since he came in with a bottom 8% SPARQ score that was redeemed only by height and length. This Bears-oriented scouting profile explains that Jelks is a double projection because he actually played in college as a hugely undersized Defensive Tackle. This January scouting profile compares his physical potential and upside to Jason Taylor (!), but while the NFL.com scouting profile sees the potential, Zierlein nevertheless ends with a comparison to career journeyman George Selvie.

6:16

BUCK ILB Joe Dineen, Kansas {Meeting at the Shrine Game}. 6'2", 230 lbs. A LB who The Draft Network's Brad Kelly describes as a guy who just "doesn't fit the modern NFL Linebacker": a converted safety who lacks both the quickness and the coverage ability you'd expect from that description, but is a great processor and run defender who led the NCAA in tackles last year. Is he more than a smaller rehash of Tyler Matakevich?

6:16

MACK ILB Leo Lewis, Miss. St. 6'1", 235 lbs. Once a top High School ILB prospect in the nation, he's underperformed and failed to ‘get it' but the native athleticism is still real and still there.

6:16

SS/FS Cua Rose, Arkansas Tech. 5'10", 180 lbs. Rose is the type of Safety worth a chance in the later rounds. On the plus side he may be undersized but he has the "stuff" to play in the box; ball skills for days; the technique and ability to man guys up; and enough pure athleticism and speed to play single high. That gets balanced against the size limitations, the extremely raw processing skills from an NFL perspective, and the lack of experience against top competition. Boom or bust; high ceiling versus chasm level floor; etc.

6:16

FS Jalen Thompson, Wash. St. 6'0", 190 lbs. A deep sleeper Safety who profiles as someone who'd fit Pittsburgh well as a backup. Thompson lacks only that special ‘extra' that turns a Safety into a Corner, and that special ‘oomph' that lets a Free Safety excel closer to the box. He'd rate higher if his tackling was anything better than awful and his experience better than limited.

6:16

SS/FS Zedrick Woods, Ole Miss. 5'11", 205 lbs. His tape consistently shows a slow footed box safety with good experience and discipline held back by very poor athletic skills. The Draft Network scouting profiles and the NFL.com scouting profile both agree on this. So how the heck did he run a 4.29 dash and compile a top 20% SPARQ score with a well balanced athletic profile on everything but height? Something doesn't add up, but the testing alone makes him worth a Day 3 flier.

6:16

CB Rashad Fenton, South Carolina. 5'10", 193 lbs. A smooth athlete who is only poor on the NFL grading curve, he offers experience in both man and zone coverage with a special talent for bump-and-run given his size. He might not have the raw, physical talent of some prospects (bottom 20% of the NFL from a SPARQ perspective) but he would fit the Steelers scheme if he can do the job physically and improve his tackling. Those, as the NFL.com scouting profile emphasizes, are real and genuine issues. Here is a good November scouting report from Joe Marino.

6:16

OL/TACKLE/GUARD Ross Pierschbacher, Alabama. 6'3½", 306 lbs. with unusually short 32⅛" arms. A solid, effective, and experienced 4-year starter who is likely to make a team but he seems to be just a guy who lacks the length you look for in a tackle, the bulk you look for in a Guard, or some other special asset to separate him from the pack. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles use words like "cerebral," "clean" and "technically sound" but worries about the lack of power.

6:16

OL/GUARD Ben Powers, Oklahoma. 6'3⅞", 310 lbs. A football player to his bones but not the athlete that Pittsburgh seems to favor on the offensive line. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

6:16

QB Taryn Christion, South Dakota St. 6'1", 225 lbs. Our own Nick Farabaugh calls Christion an "FCS version of Lamar Jackson" due to his combination of tremendous running and arm talent with massive inconsistencies based on bad fundamentals. Football IQ seems to be fine, but of course he has only faced small school competition. Another good mid-round option discounted because the Steelers QB room is so full and he projects as a lesser version of Josh Dobbs.

6:16

QB Will Grier, W. Va. 6'2½", 218 lbs. He's smart, he's a leader, he's accurate, and he's a winner. Grier is the guy for those who value QB intangibles at the top of their list. He stumbles when it comes to the measurables and the deep ball. Discounted because he's unlikely to beat out either Josh Dobbs or Mason Rudolph.

6:16

QB Marcus McMaryion, Fresno St. 6'2", 203 lbs. Tremendously mobile and able to throw on the run, and with the ability to know when to do each; but his accuracy is questionable both near and far, he hasn't shown anything like a professional level on the analysis side, and the Steelers have a well stacked room of QB talent.

6:16

RB Alexander Mattison, Boise St. 5'10⅝", 221 lbs. A basically solid prospect with decent size, decent speed, the ability to break tackles, and exceptional talent as a receiver. The drawbacks are what appears to be limited agility and vision. Blocking is up and down. The NFL.com scouting profile ends with a pretty high grade but still describes a workhorse backup. He's been hit with an extra downgrade for this board because he actually has too many similarities to Jaylen Samuels.

6:16

RB Jordan Scarlett, Florida {Visit}. 5'10⅝", 208 lbs. A speed-based player (4.47 dash) with good contact balance in the draft, but held back by what the testing showed to be hideous C.O.D. talent. The NFL.com scouting profile did include a note on "good wiggle", so maybe he deserves some slack in that regard, but it also contains warnings about sub-par vision and "dreadful hands."

6:16

WR Johnnie Dixon, Ohio St. 5'10⅜", 201 lbs. with short 30¼" and inconsistent hands. What he does offer is legit 4.41 speed and explosiveness to take the top off a defense. Just not much of anything else. It's a good trick but he's still a one trick pony. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

6:16

WR Jazz Ferguson, N.W. St. (La.). 6'4⅝ ", 227 lbs. An absolute monster of height, weight, length and speed with next to no C.O.D. skills at all. The Combine pundits describe him as a combat catch monster who actually did better against the bigger schools. The NFL.com scouting profile lists "lack of maturity and accountability" (not to mention academic problems) as the reasons why he had to leave LSU. Jazz is the younger brother of Edge Rusher Jaylon Ferguson. Part 2 of Geoffrey Benedict's Big WR series examines his film in more detail.

Steelers Pick at 6:19 and also 6:34

7:01

DL Demarcus Christmas, Florida St. 6'3⅜", 294 lbs. A stout if short-armed DT who earned infamy at the Combine with a hideous bottom 3% SPARQ score based on terrible scores almost everywhere. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles acknowledge decent power and results far better than the testing would suggest, but see his ceiling as a Day 3 backup.

7:01

SS Dravon Askew-Henry, W. Va. {Visit}. 5'10½", 205 lbs. A local boy from Aliquippa and young cousin (by marriage) of Darelle Revis who has played all three Safety positions in WVA's unique defense. Supposed to be a good tackler with decent speed and coverage skills for a Safety, but held back by a tendency to take bad angles and less physicality than you'd prefer.

7:01

SS Tanner Muse, Clemson. 6'2", 225 lbs. Darned close to being a linebacker when it comes to size, but he's played a lot of single high Safety too and has a reputation for high football IQ. Great things were expected in 2018... and then they didn't happen. What's the deal?

7:01

OL/GUARD Garrett Brumfield, LSU. 6'2", 300 lbs. A bit undersized for a Guard but the Draft Network scouting profile suggests he might be blessed with enough mobility and nasty to be a fine Day 3 flier.

7:01

OL/GUARD Phil Haynes, Wake Forest. 6'3⅝", 322 lbs. A small school titan who projects as an effective road grader even in the NFL, though it will obviously take some good coaching to make that leap. Pittsburgh usually favors more mobility but Haynes won't be ignored. Here are the NFL.com scouting profile and the very similar Draft Network scouting profiles page.

7:01

OL/GUARD/TACKLE Kaleb McGary, Washington. 6'7⅛", 317 lbs. but with surprisingly short 32⅞" arms that negate some of his length. A multiyear starter who looks like a Tackle standing up but moves and plays like a good, tough, but too-tall Guard. Will grade higher for teams willing to bet on his Right Tackle upside despite the movement issues highlighted in the NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles.

7:01

QB Clayton Thorson, Northwestern. 6'3", 230 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen. Thorson is a rhythm passer and adequate prospect who's well behind both Dobbs and Rudolph.

7:01

TE Andrew Beck, Texas. 6'4", 260 lbs. A proper tough guy TE, solid run blocker and semi-solid pass blocker, but not a weapon in the receiving game and in need of work to go from "solid" to "NFL solid" even in his areas of strength. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles.

7:01

TE C.J. Conrad, Kentucky. 6'4½", 249 lbs. Solid enough as both a run and pass blocker but not a receiver except for occasional box-out catches, and without the athletic traits that would let him succeed in that role. Did not stand out for good or ill during Shrine Game week. Here are the Draft Network scouting profiles page and the NFL.com scouting profile. The folks at Walter Football like him more and end with a Round 3-5 grade based on a comparison to Jacob Tamme, who came from the same system.

7:01

RB Bruce Anderson, N. Dakota St. 5'11¼", 209 lbs. The Draft Network scouting profiles describe Anderson as a complete back who'd fit the Steeler mold perfectly if he was 20-30 pounds bigger. Good elusiveness, vision, receiving ability, contact balance, patience, willingness to block, etc. But he is not the size of Bell, Conner or Samuels and that matters. So does the small school level of competition even if Neal Coolong's alma mater does play above its weight class. The NFL.com scouting profile views him as barely draftable.

7:01

RB Tony Brooks-James, Oregon. 5'9", 190 lbs. A speed demon and legitimate track star who can be a dynamic receiver and has just about everything else you want in a change-of-pace RB but consistent vision - and NFL size. Here is an admiring February scouting profile from a New England fan. Usually considered a UDFA prospect but the promise is there.

7:01

RB Jacques Patrick, Florida St. 6'3", 236 lbs. Sometimes the NFL.com scouting profile is so pithy and perfect that there's nothing to do but quote: "Pinball banger with tremendous size and power who doesn't have the vision or agility to find his own running room and doesn't seem to care." Add in "Grown-man pass-protection ability", but Zierlein still ends with a training-camp-only grade.

7:01

WR Ashton Dulin, Malone. 6'1⅓", 215 lbs. Genuine NFL athleticism (top 20% SPARQ score) from an incredibly small and obscure school. The NFL.com scouting profile gives him a fair shot based on his athletic talents and kick return ability, but it won't be an easy row to hoe.

Steelers Pick at 7:05

7:16

EDGE CeCe Jefferson, Florida. 6'1½", 266 lbs. A lesser version of Bud Dupree; big, strong, athletic, but challenged when it comes to bend. Flashed a bit in earlier years but lost almost all his snaps this year to two clearly superior talents (Jachai Polite and Jabari Zuniga). SPARQ score in the bottom 5%. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

7:16

BUCK ILB Jeffrey Allison, Fresno St. 5'11¼", 228 lbs. Our own Nick Farabaugh discovered Jeffrey Allison in February and became an instant fan. His research showed Allison to be a genuine leader with NFL athleticism. This goes to the Draft Network scouting profiles page, where Jon Ledyard describes the same player but limited to Buck ILB duties due to a lack of NFL-caliber speed and coverage ability. A most unfortunate Combine confirmed extremely limited athletic talent (bottom 3rd percentile of the NFL) and substandard physical assets all around except for long arms and hands. The Combine coverage noted a particular knack for timing up blitzes and, like everyone, praised his leadership and productivity. Here is the NFL.com scouting profile.

7:16

SS/MACK ILB Chase Hansen, Utah. 6'2⅞", 222 lbs. A box Safety in college who, according to this good December scouting profile, is likely to be more of an undersized ILB in the pros. A decent but definitely a developmental prospect. He will be a 26 year old rookie.

7:16

SS D'Cota Dixon, Wisconsin. 5'10", 204 lbs. A fly-around-the-field tackler, team leader and communicator with issues as he moves beyond the box. A fine player but no more than a potential backup for Edmunds and a lesser prospect than Marcus Allen was last year. He put up a hideous bottom 2% SPARQ score.

7:16

CB Blace Brown, Troy. 6'0", 184 lbs. A hideous performance at the Shrine Game highlighted the lack of basic technique and low LOC. The Combine did not help his stock either. On the plus side, he's got fine ball skills and the reaction time to make plays on the ball out of zone.

7:16

OL/GUARD Alex Bars, Notre Dame. 6'5⅞", 312 lbs. A budding star (for college) and multiyear starter who suffered a twin ACL/MCL tear in 2018. He would have been a Day 2 prospect despite some severe waist-bending issues but will now get a severe discount from everyone. It sucks even to write those words.

7:16

OL/TACKLE Cody Conway, Syracuse. 6'6", 296 lbs. Better at pass protection than run blocking, which makes a transition to Guard even harder for someone who may be as tough as nails but will need at least a year of work with an NFL strength coach and some flexibility training to loosen up in the hips. Good hand work and understanding of leverage.

7:16

OL/GUARD Lester Cotton, Alabama. 6'4", 325 lbs. Can you spell ‘road grader'? He isn't exactly immobile he's darned close until he gets moving, at which point he's darned hard to stop. Much better projection for a power-oriented, play-in-a-phone-booth system than the athletic, in-space game Pittsburgh uses.

7:16

OL/TACKLE Olisaemeka "Oli" Udo, Elon. 6'5½", 323 lbs. with extraordinary 35⅜" arms. A small school physical specimen who looked very solid at the Shrine Game. The NFL.com scouting profile and the Draft Network scouting profiles page both describe him as an all-traits, no-technique draft-and-stash developmental project.

7:16

QB Eric Dungey, Syracuse. 6'4", 226 lbs. A smart player with a limited arm and questionable accuracy except for a great knack at hitting the moving target. Ain't Gonna Happen unless Dobbs or Rudolph gets hit by a meteor.

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QB Trace McSorely, Penn St. 6'⅛", 202 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen unless Dobbs or Rudolph gets hit by a meteor. He didn't help himself at all at the Senior Bowl.

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RB Nick Brossette, LSU. 5'11⅛", 209 lbs. A tough, blue collar, get-the-hard-yards prospect with limited athleticism for anything else. According to reports he lost a good dozen pounds from his playing weight for the Combine and still put up a bottom 20% SPARQ score that was only that okay because of decent leaps. The NFL.com scouting profile describes a deep backup who might find work in short yardage situations. The Draft Network scouting profiles offer a Round 5 grade based on patience, decent vision, toughness, and football character.

7:16

RB Qadree Ollison, Pittsburgh. 6'⅝", 228 lbs. Dynamic he is not. Bottom 15% SPARQ score with an athletic profile entirely tilted toward size and strength. Powerful, solid, and hard to bring down, he is. He's also a willing if still raw blocker in pass pro, but that is offset by pretty lousy hands. Here is a September breakdown by Joe Marino. The NFL.com scouting profile foresees trouble even making a team.

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WR Quentez Cephus, Wisconsin. 6'1", 207 lbs. Ain't Gonna Happen due to allegations of sexual assault. Fair or not, some other team will risk it before Pittsburgh would.

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PUNTER Tyler Newsome, Notre Dame. 6'3", 215 lbs. A punter?! Well, yes. For two reasons. First, because he's a really good punter. Second, because Notre Dame picks three captains each year based solely on the popular vote of the players and Tyler Newsome was not only elected (punter be darned!), he was apparently on the list submitted by every man on the team. Do that and you earn your way onto the BTSC Big Board. Thirty (30) bench press reps at the Notre Dame pro day too!

9:99

EDGE Carl Granderson, Wyoming. 6'4¾", 246 lbs. Serious criminal charges were filed in February. He has real life issues to deal with and will be considered undraftable unless they are dropped.

9:99

WR Marquise "Hollywood" Brown, Oklahoma {Meeting at Combine}. 5'9⅜", 166 lbs. Antonio Brown's cousin might be the fastest guy in the draft and is certainly a "true deep threat" with polished WR skills who has earned the oh-so-common comparison to Desean Jackson. He'd have an easy mid-1st to mid-2nd grade on this board if the relationship doesn't figure in. But we have to believe it does. Drafting the young man would stick him smack dab into the middle of the highly emotional divorce with AB. What would the two men talk about when they got together for the family whatever? What kind of tension would be created in other members of the Brown clan? It is hard to see the Steelers organization doing that to any family, and that is even before we consider whether Brown v. 2 would get a fair locker room reception untainted by bad (or good) memories of Brown v. 1.

The opinions shared here are not those of the editorial staff of Behind the Steel Curtain or SB Nation. These posts are not approved in any way by the editorial staff of this web site.

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