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Steelers LB James Harrison explains his parenting style on the Steve Harvey Show

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The Pittsburgh Steelers LB was the center of controversy when he sent his sons' participation trophies back. He had the chance to explain his style when he was on the Steve Harvey Show recently.

It was 2015 when Pittsburgh Steelers LB James Harrison found himself in the middle of a controversy after he posted on social media how he was returning his sons' participation trophies. His reasoning was how he believes children should earn awards, and not just have them given to them for simply playing.

Many supported Harrison, while others chastised his theory, and recently Harrison had the chance to go on The Steve Harvey Show to talk about his parenting style and why he feels it is the right thing to do.

When Harrison was asked what he thought of people who don't like his "old school" approach to parenting, his answer was simple."I don't really care what they say," Harrison said. "I'm going to raise my kids the way my parents raised me, and I turned out pretty well.

"I'm going to do the same with them and hope they turn out as well, if not better. My kids are privileged to have a lot of things I didn't get because of what I do. I don't want them to think everything is like that."

Harrison's hard-nosed parenting style might be the product of his own upbringing. Harrison is the youngest of 14 children, and as he claimed, "anything I got, I had to earn".

The Steelers linebacker never thought his post on social media would draw national attention, but he felt compelled to explain his methodology for returning the trophies.

"I'm an old-school parent." Harrison said. "It wasn't first- or second-place (trophies) or even fifth or sixth. Before I got there, their mom had previously talked to them, and they would most likely have to return the participation trophies because she and I feel the same way about the participation trophies.

"I pulled them in and told them I'm proud, told them the trophies are going back until they earn a real trophy. There wasn't any whining or crying. It was matter of fact that they were going back. Then the kids asked, ‘Can we go play?' "

"What I wanted them to learn was you have to earn everything you get and that nothing is going to be given to you. My parents raised me that way, and I turned out pretty good."

Harrison could be the poster boy for hard work and determination, after he was rejected by the Steelers and Baltimore Ravens before eventually turning himself into a two-time Super Bowl Champion and Defensive Player of the Year. Agree or disagree with Harrison's parenting style, the man knows a thing or two about earning his keep.