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Steelers GM Kevin Colbert: Le’Veon Bell still undecided on offseason groin surgery

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Pittsburgh Steelers RB Le’Veon Bell reportedly wasn’t going to need offseason surgery, but that may not be the case after all.

NFL: AFC Championship-Pittsburgh Steelers at New England Patriots Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports

Everyone typically tries to avoid surgery as much as possible, and rightfully so. A lot of complications can happen when someone goes under the knife, especially professional athletes.

It was this reason why Pittsburgh Steelers fans were excited when a report circulated stating running back Le’Veon Bell was not going to need surgery on his injured groin which held him out of the majority of the AFC Championship game against the New England Patriots.

However, as Steelers General Manager Kevin Colbert addressed the media earlier this week at the NFL Scouting Combine, one bit of information might have fallen by the wayside when talking about prospects, positions of need and potential free agents, and that is the news Bell still might have surgery on his groin.

It has been written several times, but Bell has yet to play an entire 16-game season since he was drafted in 2013. His rookie year a foot injury kept him off the field to start the season, his second and third seasons were crippled by knee injuries and last year it was a suspension and groin injury which kept him from playing a full season.

The interesting aspect of this story is how Bell’s second opinion hasn’t resulted in a definitive answer on the injury yet. Most players who have to undergo surgery for whatever ailment they suffered during the previous season opt to have that surgery as soon as possible to ensure they are fully healthy for the next season.

Teammate Bud Dupree had his own groin/sports hernia injury in the 2016 preseason, and after surgery he missed well over half the season throughout the recovery process. Bell might be waiting for a second opinion, but logic says the decision on surgery should be coming sooner, rather than later.